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Pindar
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Pindar

Pindar (c. 518 - c. 448/7 BCE) was an ancient Greek lyric poet, probably the greatest of his time. His works have been divided into 17 books of different types of poetry, but only those containing 44 choral victory songs composed...
Jason & the Argonauts
Articleby Mark Cartwright

Jason & the Argonauts

The pan-Hellenic mythological hero Jason was famed for his expedition with the Argonauts - as the sailors on their ship the Argo were known - in search of the Golden Fleece in Kolchis on the Black Sea, one of the most popular and enduring...
The Delian League, Part 2: From Eurymedon to the Thirty Years Peace (465/4-445/4 BCE)
Articleby Christopher Planeaux

The Delian League, Part 2: From Eurymedon to the Thirty Years Peace (465/4-445/4 BCE)

The second phase of the Delian League's operations begins with the Hellenic victory over Mede forces at Eurymedon and ends with the Thirty Years Peace between Athens and Sparta (roughly 465/4 – 445/4 BCE).The Greek triumph at Eurymedon...
The Shield of Heracles: The Complete Poem
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

The Shield of Heracles: The Complete Poem

The Shield of Heracles (also known as The Shield of Herakles and, in the original, Aspis Herakleous) is a poem of 480 hexameter lines written by an unknown Greek poet in the style of Hesiod (lived 8th century BCE). It deals with the...
Ancient Greek Government
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Ancient Greek Government

Ancient Greece witnessed a wide variety of government systems as people searched for the answers to such fundamental questions as who should rule and how? Should sovereignty lie in the rule of law, the constitution, officials, or the citizens...
Hecate
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Hecate

Hecate (Hekate) is a goddess of Greek mythology capable of both good and evil. She was associated with witchcraft, magic, the Moon, doorways, and creatures of the night like hell-hounds and ghosts. Often depicted carrying a torch to remind...
Ancient Greece
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Ancient Greece

Greece is a country in southeastern Europe, known in Greek as Hellas or Ellada, and consisting of a mainland and an archipelago of islands. Ancient Greece is the birthplace of Western philosophy (Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle), literature...
Slavs
Definitionby Cristian Violatti

Slavs

The term "Slavs" designates an ethnic group of people who share a long-term cultural continuity and who speak a set of related languages known as the Slavic languages (all of which belong to the Indo-European language family). Little...
Ancient Greek Music
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Ancient Greek Music

Music (or mousike) was an integral part of life in the ancient Greek world, and the term covered not only music but also dance, lyrics, and the performance of poetry. A wide range of instruments was used to perform music which was played...
Odysseus
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Odysseus

Famed for his courage, intelligence, and leadership, Odysseus (Roman name: Ulysses) was one of the great pan-Hellenic heroes of Greek mythology. His resourcefulness and oratory skills were instrumental in the Greek victory in the Trojan War...