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Battles of Ancient Greece
Imageby Megistias

Battles of Ancient Greece

A map showing the locations of battles in ancient Greece.
Plataea 479 BCE
Imageby MinisterForBadTimes

Plataea 479 BCE

The initial positions of the Greek (blue/purple) and Persian (red) armies prior to the Battle of Plataea in August 479 BCE. The two armies were separated by the river Asopus. Also indicated are the Persian fortified camp, the town of Plataea...
Temple of Hera, Olympia
Imageby Matěj Baťha

Temple of Hera, Olympia

Remains of the Temple of Hera in Olympia, Greece.
Temple of Athena Nike
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

Temple of Athena Nike

The Temple of Athena Nike, on the southwest bastion of the Acropolis, is smaller than the other buildings behind it but no less impressive. It was completed in 420 BCE during the restoration of Athens after the Persian invasion of 480 BCE...
Hypaspist
Articleby Mark Passehl

Hypaspist

Hypaspist translitterates the Greek term meaning shield-bearer, or armour-bearer (ὁ ὑπασπιστής). This noun is formed from the verb ὑπασπίζειν - to carry the...
Greek Archaic Period
Definitionby James Lloyd

Greek Archaic Period

The Greek Archaic Period (c. 800- 479 BCE) started from what can only be termed uncertainty, and ended with the Persians being ejected from Greece for good after the battles of Plataea and Mykale in 479 BCE. The Archaic Period is preceded...
Philip II of Macedon
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Philip II of Macedon

Although he is often only remembered for being the father of Alexander the Great, Philip II of Macedon (reigned 359 BCE - 336 BCE) was an accomplished king and military commander in his own right, setting the stage for his son's victory over...
Artemisia I of Caria
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Artemisia I of Caria

Artemisia I of Caria (l. 480 BCE) was the queen of the Anatolian region of Caria (south of ancient Lydia, in modern-day Turkey). She is most famous for her role in the naval Battle of Salamis in 480 BCE in which she fought for the Persians...
Manticore
Definitionby Liana Miate

Manticore

The manticore, derived from the Early Middle Persian merthykhuwar or martiora, meaning "man-eater" (also known as a mantichora or a martichore), is a fearsome hybrid creature found in classical and medieval literature. It has the body of...
The Graces
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

The Graces

The Graces (also Charites, sing. Charis) were goddesses from Greek mythology who personified charm, grace, and beauty. Hesiod describes three Graces, and this is their most common grouping in literature and art, but their number varies depending...
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