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Hipparchia of Maroneia
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Hipparchia of Maroneia

Hipparchia of Maroneia (l. c. 350-280 BCE) was a Cynic philosopher who rejected her upper-class life to live her beliefs and share her values on the streets of ancient Athens. She was the wife of the Cynic Crates of Thebes (l. c. 360-280...
Isocrates
Definitionby Athanasios Fountoukis

Isocrates

Isocrates (436-338 BCE) was an ancient Athenian rhetorician, characterized as one of the most prominent orators of his time, even though it appears that he restricted himself to writing speeches and not orating them himself. His most notable...
The Celtic Invasion of Greece
Articleby Jeffrey King

The Celtic Invasion of Greece

Between the 5th and 4th centuries BCE, Celtic tribes moved en masse into southern Europe, intent on seizing land and wealth to feed their swelling numbers. As these tribes began crossing the Alps, they came into conflict with the Romans and...
Hipparchia the Cynic: Devoted Wife, Mother, & Outspoken Greek Philosopher
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

Hipparchia the Cynic: Devoted Wife, Mother, & Outspoken Greek Philosopher

Cynic philosopher, wife of Crates of Thebes (l. c. 360 – 280 BCE), and mother of his children, Hipparchia of Maroneia (l. c. 350 – 280 BCE) defied social norms in order to live her beliefs. She is all the more impressive in that she taught...
Pausanius' Guide To Ancient Athens
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

Pausanius' Guide To Ancient Athens

Pausanius (l. 110-180 CE) was a geographer and historian who traveled extensively, taking notes on points of interest, then wrote on them in guide books which could be used by tourists visiting the sites described. His works have long been...
Hypaspist
Articleby Mark Passehl

Hypaspist

Hypaspist translitterates the Greek term meaning shield-bearer, or armour-bearer (ὁ ὑπασπιστής). This noun is formed from the verb ὑπασπίζειν - to carry the...
The Greek Ruins in Tyre
Imageby Amin Nasr

The Greek Ruins in Tyre

The ruins of the Greek colony of Tyre 'Týros', and the sarcophagus of Antipater (c. 399-319 BCE), modern-day Lebanon.
The Origins Of War: From The Stone Age To Alexander The Great
Book Reviewby Christopher Berg

The Origins Of War: From The Stone Age To Alexander The Great

Contrary to popular belief, military history does not begin in Greece. In his book, The Origins of War, Arther Ferrill traces the development of war from prehistoric times until the time of Alexander. Ferrill begins his work in an unconventional...
Soldiers and Ghosts: A History of Battle in Classical Antiquity
Book Reviewby Christopher Berg

Soldiers and Ghosts: A History of Battle in Classical Antiquity

J. E. Lendon in his book, Soldiers and Ghosts: A History of Battle in Classical Antiquity, uses Greek and Roman culture to explain fundamental changes in the conduct of war. Lendon persuasively argues that competition and an obsession with...
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