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Magic in Ancient Greece
Articleby Mark Cartwright

Magic in Ancient Greece

For the Greeks magic (mageia or goeteia) was a wide-ranging topic which involved spells and evil prayers (epoidai), curse tablets (katadesmoi), enhancing drugs and deadly poisons (pharmaka), amulets (periapta) and powerful love potions (philtra...
Battles of Ancient Greece
Imageby Megistias

Battles of Ancient Greece

A map showing the locations of battles in ancient Greece.
Map of Classical Greece
Imageby US Military Academy

Map of Classical Greece

A map showing classical Greece and the Aegaean islands.
Ancient Argos
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Ancient Argos

Ancient Argos, located in the Peloponnese in Greece, was a major Mycenaean settlement in the Late Bronze Age (1700-1100 BCE) and remained important throughout the Greek, Hellenistic, and Roman periods until its destruction by the Visigoths...
Macedon
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Macedon

Macedon was an ancient kingdom located in the north of the Greek peninsula first inhabited by the Mackednoi tribe who, according to Herodotus, were the first to call themselves 'Hellenes' (later applied to all Greeks) and who gave the land...
Visitor's Guide to Ancient Dion
Articleby TimeTravelRome

Visitor's Guide to Ancient Dion

Dion is located at the foot of Mount Olympus in the north of Greece, in what would have been ancient Macedon. It takes its name from the most important Macedonian sanctuary dedicated to Zeus ("Dios” meaning "of Zeus”). Legend claims this...
The After-Life In Ancient Greece
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

The After-Life In Ancient Greece

In ancient Greece the continued existence of the dead depended on their constant remembrance by the living. The after-life, for the ancient Greeks, consisted of a grey and dreary world in the time of Homer (8th century BCE) and, most famously...
Hipponax & Misogyny in Ancient Greece
Articleby Lauren Hawkins

Hipponax & Misogyny in Ancient Greece

It has always been recognized that women in the ancient world were considered only a little higher in value than the man's cattle or plow and, sometimes, not even accorded that kind of respect. Examples of misogynistic attitudes toward women...
Ancient Stadium, Nemea, Greece
Imageby Mark Cartwright

Ancient Stadium, Nemea, Greece

The Panhellenic Games of Nemea were held every two years from 573 BCE to 271 BCE with a brief transferal to Argos between ca. 415BC and ca 330 BCE. Originally, they commemorated the death of Opheltes. The stadium visible today dates from...
Miltiades
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Miltiades

Miltiades (c. 555-489 BCE) was the Athenian general who defeated the Persians at the Battle of Marathon in 490 BCE. The Greeks faced a Persian force of superior numbers led by the commanding admiral Datis, who had been sent by their king...