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Battle of Alesia
Articleby Donald L. Wasson

Battle of Alesia

The Battle of Alesia was a decisive Roman victory in Julius Caesar's Gallic Wars in September 52 BCE. Roman commander Julius Caesar (100-44 BCE) and his legions faced a united Gallic army under the command of Vercingetorix (82-46 BCE), chief...
Xerxes I
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Xerxes I

Xerxes I (l. 519-465, r. 486-465 BCE), also known as Xerxes the Great, was the king of the Persian Achaemenid Empire. His official title was Shahanshah which, though usually translated as `emperor', actually means `king of kings'. He is identified...
Sabratha
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Sabratha

Sabratha was an ancient port city on the coast of North Africa (in modern-day Libya). The site was originally inhabited by the indigenous Berber Zwagha tribe in the 8th century BCE (according to the 11th-century CE historian al-Bakari) who...
Pyrrhus
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Pyrrhus

Pyrrhus (also Pyrrhos or Phyrrhus, c. 319 - 272 BCE ) was the king of Epirus in northern Greece between 306 and 302 BCE and again between 297 and 272 BCE. Winning great victories against the armies of Macedon and Rome, he is considered one...
The Wars That Inspired Game of Thrones - Alex Gendler
Videoby TED-Ed

The Wars That Inspired Game of Thrones - Alex Gendler

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-wars-that-inspired-game-of-thrones-alex-gendler Beginning around 1377, medieval England was shaken by a power struggle between two noble families, which spanned generations and involved a...
Trireme
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Trireme

The trireme (triērēs) was the devastating warship of the ancient Mediterranean with three banks of oars. Fast, manoeuvrable, and with a bronze-sheathed ram on the prow to sink an enemy ship, the trireme permitted Athens to build its maritime...
Carthaginian Army
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Carthaginian Army

The armies of Carthage permitted the city to forge the most powerful empire in the western Mediterranean from the 6th to 3rd centuries BCE. Although by tradition a seafaring nation with a powerful navy, Carthage, by necessity, had to employ...
Battle of Cannae
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Battle of Cannae

The Battle of Cannae (2 August 216 BCE) was the decisive victory of the Carthaginian army over Roman forces at Cannae, southeast Italy, during the Second Punic War (218-202 BCE). The Carthaginian general Hannibal Barca (l. 247-183 BCE), who...
Battle of the Metaurus
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Battle of the Metaurus

The Battle of the Metaurus (207 BCE) was a military engagement fought between the forces of Rome under Gaius Claudius Nero (c. 237 - c. 199 BCE), Marcus Livius Salinator (254-204 BCE), and L. Porcius Licinius and the Carthaginians under Hasdrubal...
The Delian League, Part 1: Origins Down to the Battle of Eurymedon (480/79-465/4 BCE)
Articleby Christopher Planeaux

The Delian League, Part 1: Origins Down to the Battle of Eurymedon (480/79-465/4 BCE)

This text is part of an article series on the Delian League. The modern term Delian League refers to the primarily maritime συμμᾰχία or symmachy (offensive-defensive alliance) among various Greek poleis, which emerged after the second...