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Orpheus
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Orpheus

Orpheus is a figure from ancient Greek mythology, most famous for his virtuoso ability in playing the lyre or kithara. His music could charm the wild animals of the forest, and even streams would pause and trees bend a little closer to hear...
Thales of Miletus
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Thales of Miletus

Thales of Miletus (l. c. 585 BCE) is traditionally regarded as the first Western philosopher and mathematician. He was born and lived in Miletus, a Greek colony on the west coast of present day Turkey, referenced as the birthplace of Greek...
Agamemnon (Play)
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Agamemnon (Play)

The play Agamemnon was written by one of the greatest Greek tragedians Aeschylus (c. 525 – 455 BCE), “Father of Greek Tragedy.” Older than both Sophocles and Euripides, he was the most popular and influential of all tragedians...
Theatre of Dionysos Eleuthereus
Articleby Mark Cartwright

Theatre of Dionysos Eleuthereus

The theatre of Dionysos Eleuthereus on the south slope of the acropolis of Athens was first built in the 6th century BCE. Modified and expanded over the centuries, it is the oldest Greek theatre and is the site where some of the most famous...
Philosophy and the Practice of Medicine in Ancient Egypt
Videoby Wafeek Wahby

Philosophy and the Practice of Medicine in Ancient Egypt

This series, "A Futuristic Look at Ancient Lenses: A Symposium on Ancient Egypt" focuses on topics and discussions from Ancient Egypt, and involved scholars from across the Eastern Illinois University Campus. In this video, Dr. Kip McGilliard...
The Technology of Medicine in the Pharaonic Age
Videoby techEIU

The Technology of Medicine in the Pharaonic Age

This series, "A Futuristic Look at Ancient Lenses: A Symposium on Ancient Egypt" focuses on topics and discussions from Ancient Egypt, and involved scholars from across the Eastern Illinois University Campus. In this video, Dr. Thomas Hawkins...
Roman Literature
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Roman Literature

The Roman Empire and its predecessor the Roman Republic produced an abundance of celebrated literature; poetry, comedies, dramas, histories, and philosophical tracts; the Romans avoided tragedies. Much of it survives to this day. However...
Plague of Cyprian, 250-270 CE
Articleby John Horgan

Plague of Cyprian, 250-270 CE

The Plague of Cyprian erupted in Ethiopia around Easter of 250 CE. It reached Rome in the following year eventually spreading to Greece and further east to Syria. The plague lasted nearly 20 years and, at its height, reportedly killed as...
Greco-Bactrian and Indo-Greek Kingdoms in Ancient Texts
Articleby Antoine Simonin

Greco-Bactrian and Indo-Greek Kingdoms in Ancient Texts

The rarity of the appearance of Greco-Bactrian and Indo-Greek kingdoms in ancient literature is one of the reasons why those states are so little-known today. Indo-Greek literature did exist, but none has been found that speaks about the...
Gladatorial Medicine in the Roman Empire
Videoby University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

Gladatorial Medicine in the Roman Empire

Courtney Ann Roby, PhD, from the Dept. of Classics at Cornell University presents, "Gladiatorial Medicine in the Roman Empire." In this lecture, Dr. Roby examines the career of Galen of Pergamum, a celebrity physician of Rome whose patients...