Search Results: Trireme

Search

The Extent of the Roman Empire
Articleby Donald L. Wasson

The Extent of the Roman Empire

Time has seen the rise and fall of a number of great empires - the Babylonian, the Assyrian, the Egyptian, and lastly, the Persian. Regardless of the size or skill of their army or the capabilities of their leaders, all of these empires...
Comparison of the Greek City-States: Athens vs Sparta
Videoby Ancient History Encyclopedia

Comparison of the Greek City-States: Athens vs Sparta

Athens vs Sparta! Learn all about the similarities and differences of the Greek City-States, Athens and Sparta! This short comparison with Kelly Macquire discusses the important differences between Athens and Sparta during the height of their...
Why Socrates Hated Democracy
Videoby The School of Life

Why Socrates Hated Democracy

We generally think vey well of democracy. It’s interesting to discover that one of the Ancient Greece’s greatest achievements, Philosophy, was highly suspicious of its other achievement, Democracy. The founding father of Greek Philosophy...
Battle of the Eurymedon, c. 466 BCE
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

Battle of the Eurymedon, c. 466 BCE

The Battle of the Eurymedon (c. 466 BCE, also given as the Battle of the Eurymedon River) was a military engagement between the Greeks of the Delian League and the forces of the Achaemenid Empire toward the end of the reign of Xerxes I (r...
Battle of the Granicus
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Battle of the Granicus

The Battle of the Granicus in May 334 BCE was Alexander the Great's (356-323 BCE) first major victory against the forces of the Achaemenid Empire. Alexander had crossed the Hellespont with his combined Macedonian and Greek forces and stepped...
Romans vs. Carthaginians - Text & Labelling
Worksheet/Activityby Marion Wadowski

Romans vs. Carthaginians - Text & Labelling

This activity has been designed to fit a 20-30-minute slot for your class and is suitable for both online and classroom teaching, as well as homeschooling. Students have to label the illustrations of Roman and Carthaginian soldiers, based...
Carthaginian Army
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Carthaginian Army

The armies of Carthage permitted the city to forge the most powerful empire in the western Mediterranean from the 6th to 3rd centuries BCE. Although by tradition a seafaring nation with a powerful navy, Carthage, by necessity, had to employ...
Zarathustra
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Zarathustra

Zarathustra (also given as Zoroaster, Zartosht, Zarathustra Spitama, l. c. 1500-1000 BCE) was the Persian priest-turned-prophet who founded the religion of Zoroastrianism (also given as Mazdayasna “devotion to Mazda”), the first monotheistic...
Ahura Mazda
Definitionby Radu Cristian

Ahura Mazda

Ahura Mazda (also known as Ahuramazda, Harzoo, Hormazd, Hourmazd, Hurmuz, Ohrmazd, 'Lord' or 'Spirit') is the highest spirit worshipped in Zoroastrianism, the old Mede and ancient Persian mythology which spread across Asia predating Christianity...
Zorvanism
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Zorvanism

Zorvanism (also given as Zuvanism, Zurvanism) was a sect of the Persian religion Zoroastrianism which emerged in the late Achaemenid Empire (c. 550-330 BCE) and flourished during the Sassanian Empire (224-651 CE). It is often referenced as...