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Carthage
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Carthage

Carthage was a Phoenician city-state on the coast of North Africa (the site of modern-day Tunis) which, prior the conflict with Rome known as the Punic Wars (264-146 BCE), was the largest, most affluent, and powerful political entity in the...
Wars of the Diadochi
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Wars of the Diadochi

On June 10, 323 BCE Alexander the Great died in Babylon. Although historians have debated the exact cause most agree that the empire he built was left without adequate leadership for there was no clear successor or heir. The military commanders...
Cassander
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Cassander

Cassander (c. 355-297 BCE, r. 305-297 BCE) was self-proclaimed king of Macedon during the political turmoil following Alexander's death. Born in Greece as the son of Antipater, the regent of Macedon and Greece in the absence of Alexander...
Seleucus I Nicator
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Seleucus I Nicator

Seleucus I Nicator (l. c. 358-281 BCE, r. 305-281 BCE) was one of the generals of Alexander the Great (l. 356-323 BCE) who make up the group of Diadochi ("successors") who divided the vast Macedonian Empire between them after Alexander's...
Hamilcar Barca
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Hamilcar Barca

Hamilcar Barca (c. 285 – c. 228 BCE) was a Carthaginian general active in the First Punic War (264-241 BCE). He then quashed a rebellion closer to home between 241 and 237 BCE before returning abroad, where he successfully expanded...
Praetorian Galley
Imageby Mark Cartwright

Praetorian Galley

A Roman coin depicting a praetorian galley. Silver denarius of Mark Antony, 32-31 BCE. (Archaeological Museum, Tarragona, Spain)
Spartan Territory
Imageby Marsyas

Spartan Territory

A map indicating the location of Sparta and her territory in the Peloponnese.
Fall of Rome - Podcast & Mindmap
Worksheet/Activityby Marion Wadowski

Fall of Rome - Podcast & Mindmap

This activity has been designed to fit a 10-minute slot for your class. Based on a 5-minute podcast, students have to fill in a mind map to identify the main reasons for Rome's fall. It is part of our Fall of Rome pack where you can find...
Roman Theatre at Aphrodisias, Caria
Imageby Carole Raddato

Roman Theatre at Aphrodisias, Caria

The Roman theatre of Aphrodisias in Caria (modern-day Turkey), built in the second half of the 1st century BCE on the eastern slope of the acropolis.
The Tetrapylon of Aphrodisias
Imageby Carole Raddato

The Tetrapylon of Aphrodisias

The Tetrapylon of Aphrodisias in Caria (now Turkey) was a monumental gateway leading from the main north-south street of the town into a large forecourt in front of the Temple of Aphrodite. It was built c. 200 CE.