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Battle of Marathon, 490 BCE
Imageby Dept. of History, US Military Academy

Battle of Marathon, 490 BCE

A map illustrating the position of Greek (blue) and Persian (red) forces at the Battle of Marathon in 490 BCE. The allied Greek city-states led by Athens would win the battle and repel the invasion of Greece by Persian King Darius.
Augustus
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Augustus

Augustus Caesar (27 BCE - 14 CE) was the name of the first and, by most accounts, greatest Roman emperor. Augustus was born Gaius Octavius Thurinus on 23 September 63 BCE. Octavian was adopted by his great-uncle Julius Caesar in 44 BCE, and...
Battle of Immae
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Battle of Immae

The Battle of Immae (272 CE) was fought between the forces of the Roman emperor Aurelian (270-275 CE) and those of the Palmyrene Empire of Zenobia (267-273 CE) resulting in a Roman victory and, ultimately, the capture of Zenobia and an end...
The Battle of Abritus
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

The Battle of Abritus

The Battle of Abritus was an engagement fought between the armies of Rome under the emperor Decius (249-251 CE) and a coalition of Goths under the leadership of Cniva (c. 250 - c. 270 CE) in 251 CE resulting in a victory for Cniva and the...
War in Ancient Times
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

War in Ancient Times

The word 'war' comes to English from the old High German language word Werran (to confuse or to cause confusion) through the Old English Werre (meaning the same), and is a state of open and usually declared armed conflict between political...
The Barracks Emperors
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

The Barracks Emperors

The “Barracks Emperors” is a term coined by later historians referring to the Roman emperors who were chosen and supported by the army during the period known as the Crisis of the Third Century (also known as the Imperial Crisis, 235-284...
Ancient Greek Theatre
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Ancient Greek Theatre

Greek theatre began in the 6th century BCE in Athens with the performance of tragedy plays at religious festivals. These, in turn, inspired the genre of Greek comedy plays. The two types of Greek drama would be hugely popular and performances...
Cats in the Ancient World
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

Cats in the Ancient World

Cats and humans have shared in each other's lives for thousands of years and, even though they have not always been regarded as highly as in the present, have played an important role in a number of cultures. Always enigmatic, the cat has...
Roman Medicine
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Roman Medicine

Roman medicine was greatly influenced by earlier Greek medicine and literature but would also make its own unique contribution to the history of medicine through the work of such famous experts as Galen and Celsus. Whilst there were professional...
Ancient Greek Tragedy
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Ancient Greek Tragedy

Greek tragedy was a popular and influential form of drama performed in theatres across ancient Greece from the late 6th century BCE. The most famous playwrights of the genre were Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides and many of their works...
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