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The Sack of Rome by the Gauls, 390 BCE
Articleby Ludwig Heinrich Dyck

The Sack of Rome by the Gauls, 390 BCE

After the Gauls defeated the Romans at the confluence of the Tiber and the Allia rivers, the Gauls marched on to Rome. In late July 390 BCE, the undefended city fell to the invaders to be burnt and sacked. Only on the Capitol Hill, did a...
Legio IX Hispana
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Legio IX Hispana

Legio IX Hispana served with Julius Caesar in Gaul and against Pompey in the Civil Wars. Later, it fought alongside Augustus in his Cantabrian Wars and was one of the four legions Claudius took with him in his invasion of Britain in 43 CE...
The Role of Women in the Roman World
Articleby Mark Cartwright

The Role of Women in the Roman World

The exact role and status of women in the Roman world, and indeed in most ancient societies, has often been obscured by the biases of both ancient male writers and 19-20th century CE male scholars, a situation only relatively recently redressed...
Legio V Alaudae
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Legio V Alaudae

Legio V Alaudae, referenced in early accounts only as the "Fifth", was one of the many legions of the Roman army that helped Julius Caesar (100-44 BCE) to achieve success as a military commander in Gaul, Spain, and Africa. Later stationed...
Ancient Naval Battle
Imageby The Creative Assembly

Ancient Naval Battle

This is a 3D rendition of how an ancient ship ramming an enemy vessel may have looked.
Mithridates VI
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Mithridates VI

Mithridates VI (120-63 BCE, also known as Mithradates, Mithradates Eupator Dionysius, Mithridates the Great) was the king of Pontus (modern-day northeastern Turkey) who was regarded by his people as their savior from the oppression of Rome...
The Goths
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

The Goths

The Goths were a Germanic tribe who are frequently referenced for their part in the fall of the Roman Empire and their subsequent rise to power in the region of northern Europe, initially in Italy. They are first referenced by Herodotus as...
Roman Roads
Articleby Mark Cartwright

Roman Roads

The Romans built roads over ancient routes and created a huge number of new ones. Engineers were audacious in their plans to join one point to another in as direct a line as possible whatever the difficulties in geography and costs. Consequently...
Roman Stone-throwing Carroballista
Imageby Pearson Scott Foresman

Roman Stone-throwing Carroballista

The carroballista was a Roman artillery weapon which used torsion to propel bolts or stones over several hundred metres. They were in use from the 3rd century BCE to the 4th century CE.
Roman Britain
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Roman Britain

Britain was a significant addition to the ever-expanding Roman Empire. For decades Rome had been conquering the Mediterranean Sea - defeating Carthage in the Punic Wars, overwhelming Macedon and Greece, and finally marching into Syria and...
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