Search Results: Roman Warfare

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The Roman Domus
Articleby Steven Fife

The Roman Domus

The Roman domus was much more than a place of dwelling for a Roman familia. It also served as a place of business and a religious center for worship. The size of a domus could range from a very small house to a luxurious mansion. In some...
Vikings
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Vikings

The Vikings were diverse Scandinavian seafarers from Norway, Sweden, and Denmark whose raids and subsequent settlements significantly impacted the cultures of Europe and were felt as far as the Mediterranean regions c. 790 - c. 1100 CE. The...
Roman Daily Life
Articleby Donald L. Wasson

Roman Daily Life

From the early days of the Roman Republic through the volatile reigns of such ignoble emperors as Caligula, Nero, and Commodus, the Roman Empire continued to expand, stretching its borders to encompass the entire Mediterranean Sea as well...
The Battle of Lake Trasimene
Imageby The Department of History, United States Military Academy

The Battle of Lake Trasimene

As Hannibal passed Lake Trasimene, he came to a place very suitable for an ambush, and hearing that Flaminius had broken camp and was pursuing him, made preparations for the impending battle. To the north was a series of heavily forested...
Kalkriese Face Mask
Imageby Carole Raddato

Kalkriese Face Mask

This military face mask (thought to have been worn in battle and during parades by cavalry) is one of the most exceptional finds at the site of the Battle of the Teutoburg Forest. It is one the oldest facial helmets knows in the Roman army...
Dogs & Their Collars in Ancient Rome
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

Dogs & Their Collars in Ancient Rome

Dogs were highly valued in ancient Rome, as they were in other cultures, and the Roman dog served many of the same purposes as it did in, say, Egypt and Persia - as hunters, guardians, and companions - but with a significant difference in...
Dodekaschoinos
Definitionby Arienne King

Dodekaschoinos

The Dodekaschoinos (literally "Twelve Cities" in Greek) was the name of a region in Lower Nubia that became an important province of the Ptolemaic Kingdom after it was annexed from Meroitic Nubia by the Egyptian kingdom. The area...
Roman Coinage
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Roman Coinage

Roman coins were first produced in the late 4th century BCE in Italy and continued to be minted for another eight centuries across the empire. Denominations and values more or less constantly changed but certain types such as the sestertii...
Rome's Response to the Spread of Christianity
Articleby Rebecca Denova

Rome's Response to the Spread of Christianity

During the 1st century CE, a sect of Jews in Jerusalem claimed that their teacher, Jesus of Nazareth, was the 'messiah' of Israel. 'Messiah' meant 'anointed one', or someone chosen by the God of Israel to lead when God would intervene in...
The Assassination of Julius Caesar
Articleby Donald L. Wasson

The Assassination of Julius Caesar

Veni, vidi, vici! This was the simple message the Roman commander Julius Caesar sent to the Senate in Rome after a resounding victory in the east against King Pharnaces of Pontus - a message that demonstrated both arrogance as well as great...
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