Search Results: Roman Warfare

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Northern Wei Cavalry Rider
Imageby The British Museum

Northern Wei Cavalry Rider

An earthenware cavalry rider from the Northern Wei dynasty. 386-534 CE. Height: 21.5 cm. (Brtish Museum, London)
Hussite Wars
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Hussite Wars

The Hussite Wars (1419 to c. 1434) were a series of conflicts fought in Bohemia (modern-day Czech Republic) between followers of the reformer Jan Hus and Catholic loyalists toward the end of the Bohemian Reformation (c. 1380 to c. 1436...
The Classic Maya Collapse
Articleby Mark Cartwright

The Classic Maya Collapse

The Mesoamerican Terminal Classic period (c. 800-925) saw one of the most dramatic civilization collapses in history. Within a century or so the flourishing Classic Maya civilization fell into a permanent decline when once-great cities were...
The Battle of Carrhae (53 B.C.E.)
Videoby Historia Civilis

The Battle of Carrhae (53 B.C.E.)

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Silver in Antiquity
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Silver in Antiquity

Silver had great value and aesthetic appeal in many ancient cultures where it was used to make jewellery, tableware, figurines, ritual objects and rough-cut pieces known as hacksilver which could be used in trade or to store wealth. The metal...
Medieval Trebuchet
Imageby Mark Cartwright

Medieval Trebuchet

A reconstruction of a medieval catapult or trebuchet of the 12th-14th century CE. Chateau of Les Baux-de-Provence, France. The trebuchet used a counterweight of stones to spring a single arm and propel a stone or incendiary over a distance...
Suetonius
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Suetonius

Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus (c. 69 – c. 130/140 CE), better known simply as Suetonius, was a Roman writer whose most famous work is his biographies of the first 12 Caesars. With a position close to the imperial court he was able to...
Serapis
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Serapis

Serapis is a Graeco-Egyptian god of the Ptolemaic Period (323-30 BCE) of Egypt developed by the monarch Ptolemy I Soter (r. 305-282 BCE) as part of his vision to unite his Egyptian and Greek subjects. Serapis’ cult later spread throughout...
Triumph of Titus
Imageby Jean-Guillaume Moitte (Artist)

Triumph of Titus

A reconstructed relief panel from the original on the Arch of Titus, Rome, c. 81 CE. The scene, showing the triumph of Titus, is carved in three-quarter view and has Titus riding a four-horse chariot (quadriga) and shows him being crowned...
Galen
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Galen

Galen (129-216 CE) was a Greek physician, author, and philosopher, working in Rome, who influenced both medical theory and practice until the middle of the 17th century CE. Owning a large, personal library, he wrote hundreds of medical treatises...
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