Search Results: Punic Wars

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Parthian Warfare
Definitionby Patrick Scott Smith, M. A.

Parthian Warfare

Parthian warfare was characterized by the extensive use of cavalry and archers. Coming at enemy troops from all directions Parthian riders created confusion and wreaked havoc. They even developed the famous “Parthian shot.” Able to shoot...
Carthaginian Mercenaries
Imageby The Creative Assembly

Carthaginian Mercenaries

An artist's impression of how a troop of Carthaginian mercenaries may have appeared in battle formation.
Abu Bakr
Definitionby Syed Muhammad Khan

Abu Bakr

Abu Bakr (l. 573-634 CE, r. 632-634 CE) was an early convert of Islam; he was a close friend and confidant of the Islamic Prophet Muhammad, and became the first caliph of the Islamic empire – a successor to Muhammad's temporal position but...
Peace of Callias
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Peace of Callias

The Peace of Callias (aka Kallias) refers to a possible peace treaty made in the mid-5th century BCE between Athens and Persia following the Persian Wars. The existence of such a treaty is not agreed upon by all historians, and if it did...
Greco-Persian Wars
Imageby Kelly Macquire

Greco-Persian Wars

The Greco-Persian Wars or Persian Wars were a series of battles in the 5th century BCE between Greece and Persia. This series of wars consisted of some famous battles; Marathon, Thermopylae, Salamis and Plataea which resulted in a Greek victory...
Battle of Plataea
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Battle of Plataea

The Battle of Plataea was a land battle between Greeks and Persians near the small town of Plataea in Boeotia in 479 BCE. Following up their naval victory at the Battle of Salamis in September 480 BCE against the same enemy, the Greeks again...
Seleucus I Nicator
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Seleucus I Nicator

Seleucus I Nicator (l. c. 358-281 BCE, r. 305-281 BCE) was one of the generals of Alexander the Great (l. 356-323 BCE) who make up the group of Diadochi ("successors") who divided the vast Macedonian Empire between them after Alexander's...
Cassander
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Cassander

Cassander (c. 355-297 BCE, r. 305-297 BCE) was self-proclaimed king of Macedon during the political turmoil following Alexander's death. Born in Greece as the son of Antipater, the regent of Macedon and Greece in the absence of Alexander...
Umar
Definitionby Syed Muhammad Khan

Umar

Umar ibn al-Khattab (r. 634-644 CE) was the second caliph of the Rashidun Caliphate (632-661 CE, as the first four caliphs are referred to by the Sunni Muslims). He was an early convert of Islam and one of the close companions of the Islamic...
Themistocles
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Themistocles

Themistocles (c. 524 - c. 460 BCE) was an Athenian statesman and general (strategos) whose emphasis on naval power and military skills were instrumental during the Persian wars, victory in which ensured that Greece survived its greatest ever...
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