Search Results: Philip II of Macedon

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Ptolemy I
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Ptolemy I

Ptolemy I Soter (366-282 BCE) was one of the successor kings to the empire of Alexander the Great. He served not only as king of Egypt but also the founder of the Ptolemaic Dynasty, a dynasty which included the infamous Cleopatra VII...
Causes of the Hundred Years' War
Articleby Mark Cartwright

Causes of the Hundred Years' War

The Hundred Years' War (1337-1453 CE) was an intermittent conflict fought between England and France that started when king Edward III of England (r. 1327-1377 CE) squabbled with Philip VI of France (r. 1328-1350 CE) over feudal rights concerning...
Alexander the Great and Hellenization in the 4th Century BCE
Videoby Ancient History Encyclopedia

Alexander the Great and Hellenization in the 4th Century BCE

Alexander the Great was the son of Philip II of Macedon and the man who started the hellenistic era during the 4th century BCE. After inheriting the Macedonian Empire when Philip II died, Alexander the Great extended it into the largest empire...
Professor Theodore Antikas with Laura-Wynn Antikas Holding the Shorter Greave from the Royal Tomb of Vergina
Imageby Antikas team archive

Professor Theodore Antikas with Laura-Wynn Antikas Holding the Shorter Greave from the Royal Tomb of Vergina

Professor Theodore Antikas with Laura-Wynn Antikas holding the shorter greave from the Royal Tomb of Vergina in front of the display cabinet in the Archaeological Museum of Vergina. Courtesy of the Antikas team archive.
Ptolemaic Dynasty
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Ptolemaic Dynasty

The Ptolemaic dynasty controlled Egypt for almost three centuries (305 – 30 BCE), eventually falling to the Romans. Oddly, while they ruled Egypt, they never became Egyptian. Instead, they isolated themselves in the capital city of Alexandria...
Gordian Emperors
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Gordian Emperors

When Maximinus Thrax was named Roman emperor upon the death of Alexander Severus, the news was not well-received by many in Rome and the Roman Senate considered him an illiterate barbarian. His financial excesses, principally used to fund...
Alexander the Great: A Case Study in Martial Leadership
Articleby Christopher Berg

Alexander the Great: A Case Study in Martial Leadership

History is not predictable; in many ways it can take on a life of its own. But sometimes, an individual's sheer presence is enough to bend history to his will. One such individual was Alexander the Great. Through his conviction, vision, mental...
Game Interview: Old World by Mohawk Games
Interviewby Jan van der Crabben

Game Interview: Old World by Mohawk Games

In this article, we interview the creators of Old World, the new upcoming game by Mohawk Games. We are here with Leyla Johnson, the head writer of the game and CEO, and Soren Johnson, who is the creative director. Jan (Ancient History...
The Battle of Gaugamela, 331 BCE
Articleby Grant

The Battle of Gaugamela, 331 BCE

After securing the eastern Mediterranean seaboard and Egypt, Alexander the Great pushed east into Mesopotamia with the intention of bringing Darius to battle. After crossing the Euphrates River unopposed, he marched his army eastward along...
Seleucus I Nicator
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Seleucus I Nicator

Seleucus I Nicator (l. c. 358-281 BCE, r. 305-281 BCE) was one of the generals of Alexander the Great (l. 356-323 BCE) who make up the group of Diadochi ("successors") who divided the vast Macedonian Empire between them after Alexander's...
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