Search Results: Persian Wars

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Fire Temple
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Fire Temple

Fire Temples are places of worship in the Zoroastrian religion. They were known as ataskada (“house of fire”) by the Persians but are best known today by their Greek name pyratheia (fire temple). They are thought to have originated from the...
Avesta
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Avesta

The Avesta is the scripture of Zoroastrianism which developed from an oral tradition founded by the prophet Zoroaster (Zarathustra, Zartosht) sometime between c. 1500-1000 BCE. The title is generally accepted as meaning “praise”, though this...
Legions of the Dacian Wars
Articleby Donald L. Wasson

Legions of the Dacian Wars

The Dacian Wars started after Decebalus (r. c. 87-106 CE) raided the Roman province of Moesia in 85 CE. Emperor Domitian's (r. 81-96 CE) Dacian campaigns in 86-87 CE reached an uneasy peace, but the conflict was renewed under the reign of...
Shapur II
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Shapur II

Shapur II (r. 309-379 CE, also Sapur II) was the tenth monarch of the Sassanian Empire (224-651 CE) and among the most successful. Under his reign – which lasted his entire life – the Avesta (Zoroastrian scripture) was committed to writing...
Elephants in Greek & Roman Warfare
Articleby Mark Cartwright

Elephants in Greek & Roman Warfare

In the search for ever more impressive and lethal weapons to shock the enemy and bring total victory the armies of ancient Greece, Carthage, and even sometimes Rome turned to the elephant. Huge, exotic, and frightening the life out of an...
Trireme
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Trireme

The trireme (triērēs) was the devastating warship of the ancient Mediterranean with three banks of oars. Fast, manoeuvrable, and with a bronze-sheathed ram on the prow to sink an enemy ship, the trireme permitted Athens to build its maritime...
Overview of Ancient Persia
Videoby Khan Academy

Overview of Ancient Persia

This brief video explains the origin of the terms "Persia" and Zoroastrianism. It also puts the Median, Achaemenid, Seleucid, Parthian and Sassanian Empires in context.
Artemisia I of Caria
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Artemisia I of Caria

Artemisia of Caria (also known as Artemisia I) was the queen of the Anatolian region of Caria (south of ancient Lydia, in modern-day Turkey). She is most famous for her role in the naval Battle of Salamis in 480 BCE in which she fought for...
Ancient Greece Teaching Resource Bundle
Teaching Bundleby Patrick Goodman

Ancient Greece Teaching Resource Bundle

This Ancient Greece Teaching Resource Bundle is a collection of teaching resources that can be downloaded for free – no registration required. Our teaching resources and lesson plans are adapted to students' different levels of...
Seleucus I Nicator
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Seleucus I Nicator

Seleucus I Nicator (l. c. 358-281 BCE, r. 305-281 BCE) was one of the generals of Alexander the Great (l. 356-323 BCE) who make up the group of Diadochi ("successors") who divided the vast Macedonian Empire between them after Alexander's...
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