Search Results: Persian Wars

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Hafez Shiraz
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Hafez Shiraz

Hafez Shiraz (also given as Hafiz, l. 1315-1390 CE) is considered the greatest of the Persian poets and among the most famous and admired writers in world literature. He is among the most often translated poets in the present day and his...
Kosrau I
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Kosrau I

Kosrau I (r. 531-579 CE) was the greatest king of the Sassanian Empire (224-651 CE) in virtually every aspect of his reign. He reformed the military, the Persian government, expanded his territories, engaged in large-scale building projects...
Antipater (Macedonian General)
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Antipater (Macedonian General)

Antipater (c. 399-319 BCE) was a Macedonian statesman and loyal lieutenant of both Alexander the Great and his father Philip II of Macedon. As a regent in Alexander's absence, Antipater subdued rebellions and mollified uprisings, proving...
Anahita
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Anahita

Anahita is the ancient Persian goddess of fertility, water, health and healing, and wisdom. Owing to her association with life-giving properties, she also came to be connected with ancient Persian warfare as soldiers would pray to her for...
Kingdom of Magadha: Wars and Warfare
Articleby Dr Avantika Lal

Kingdom of Magadha: Wars and Warfare

In ancient India from the 6th century BCE onwards, the kingdom of Magadha (6th century BCE to 4th century BCE) made a mark for itself. Located in the eastern part of India in what is today the state of Bihar, it outshone other kingdoms and...
Coin of a Persian Satrap
Imageby Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin

Coin of a Persian Satrap

In the Persian Empire, some regional governors (satraps) were authorized to issue coins for military purposes. They combine Persian and Greek imagery, showing a satrap's head and a local reverse image. These are some of the earliest coin...
Coins Depicting a Persian Satrap
Imageby Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin

Coins Depicting a Persian Satrap

In the Persian Empire, some regional governors (satraps) were authorized to issue coins for military purposes. They combine Persian and Greek imagery, showing a strap's head and a local reverse image. These are some of the earliest coin portraits...
Carthage
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Carthage

Carthage was a Phoenician city-state on the coast of North Africa (the site of modern-day Tunis) which, prior the conflict with Rome known as the Punic Wars (264-146 BCE), was the largest, most affluent, and powerful political entity in the...
Henry VI of England
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Henry VI of England

Henry VI of England ruled as king from 1422 to 1461 CE and again from 1470 to 1471 CE. Succeeding his father Henry V of England (r. 1413-1422 CE), Henry VI was crowned the king of France in 1431 CE but he could not prevent a French revival...
Cultural links between India & the Greco-Roman world
Articleby Sanujit

Cultural links between India & the Greco-Roman world

Cyrus the Great (558-530 BCE) built the first universal empire, stretching from Greece to the Indus River. This was the famous Achaemenid Dynasty of Persia. An inscription at Naqsh-i-Rustam, the tomb of his able successor Darius I (521-486...
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