Search Results: Persian Wars

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Macedon
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Macedon

Macedon was an ancient kingdom located in the north of the Greek peninsula first inhabited by the Mackednoi tribe who, according to Herodotus, were the first to call themselves 'Hellenes' (later applied to all Greeks) and who gave the land...
Legions of Moesia
Articleby Donald L. Wasson

Legions of Moesia

The province of Moesia was vital to the Roman military’s protection of the Balkans. Subdued by the Roman commander Marcus Licinius Crassus in 29 BCE, it was initially part of Macedonia. Due to its location along the Danube, it became essential...
Ctesiphon
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Ctesiphon

Ctesiphon was an ancient city and trade center on the east bank of the Tigris River founded during the reign of Mithridates I (the Great, 171-132 BCE). It is best known in the modern day for the single-span arch, Taq Kasra, which is the most...
The Battle of Pelusium: a Persian Victory Decided by Cats
Videoby Kelly Macquire

The Battle of Pelusium: a Persian Victory Decided by Cats

The Battle of Pelusium was a battle waged between Ancient Egypt under Pharaoh Psametik III and Cambyses II, King of the Achaemenid Persian Empire. The most recognisable feature is the Persian victory due to Cambyses’ use of animals (especially...
Persian Hero Garshasp
Imageby Baloo1000

Persian Hero Garshasp

Garshasp kills the dragon. Shahnameh, Sultanate of Delhi, c. 1450 CE Rietberg Museum
Persian Hero Rustum
Imageby Maksim

Persian Hero Rustum

Scene from Shahnameh: Rustam (or Rustum) shoots Isfandiyar in the eyes with a double-pointed arrow, from manuscript Ms. or. fol. 4251, Berlin State Library
Cassander
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Cassander

Cassander (c. 355-297 BCE, r. 305-297 BCE) was self-proclaimed king of Macedon during the political turmoil following Alexander's death. Born in Greece as the son of Antipater, the regent of Macedon and Greece in the absence of Alexander...
Athens
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Athens

Athens, Greece, with its famous Acropolis, has come to symbolize the whole of the country in the popular imagination, and not without cause. It not only has its iconic ruins and the famous port of Piraeus but, thanks to ancient writers, its...
Perdiccas
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Perdiccas

Perdiccas (d. 321 BCE) was one of Alexander the Great's commanders, and after his death, custodian of the treasury, regent over Philip III and Alexander IV, and commander of the royal army. When Alexander the Great crossed the Hellespont...
Lysimachus
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Lysimachus

Lysimachus (c. 361-281 BCE) was one of Alexander the Great's trusted bodyguards and a member of his Companion Cavalry. Although he obtained Macedonian citizenship, his father was a Thessalian named Agathocles. After Alexander's death in...
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