Search Results: Perdiccas

Search

Warfare & Battles in Ancient Greece
Lesson Packby Patrick Goodman

Warfare & Battles in Ancient Greece

We have prepared four lesson plans including classroom activities, assignments, homework, and keys as well as: Multiple choice quiz questions in an excel format. Glossary of keywords and concepts in an excel format. Open questions...
Battle of Chaeronea
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Battle of Chaeronea

The Battle of Chaeronea took place in 338 BCE on an early August morning outside the town of Chaeronea. Although for centuries the cities of Athens and Sparta dominated Greece, politically, militarily and economically, the Battle of Chaeronea...
Arrian
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Arrian

Lucius Flavius Arrianus, commonly known as Arrian (86 - c. 160 CE) was a Greek historian, philosopher, and statesman from Nicomedia, capital of the Roman province of Bithynia. Arrian is recognized as one of the most renowned authors of the...
Hellenistic Successor Kingdoms c. 301 BCE
Imageby Simeon Netchev

Hellenistic Successor Kingdoms c. 301 BCE

A map illustrating the Hellenistic World and the successor kingdoms of the Diadochi (Alexander the Great's successors) c. 301 BCE.
Elephants in Greek & Roman Warfare
Articleby Mark Cartwright

Elephants in Greek & Roman Warfare

In the search for ever more impressive and lethal weapons to shock the enemy and bring total victory the armies of ancient Greece, Carthage, and even sometimes Rome turned to the elephant. Huge, exotic, and frightening the life out of an...
Philippi
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Philippi

Philippi was an important city in eastern Macedon which flourished in the Hellenistic, Roman, and Byzantine Periods. Situated between the Strymon and Nestos rivers, the city was valued in antiquity for its nearby gold mines. Site of the famous...
Phocion
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Phocion

Phocion (c. 402 – 318 BCE) was an Athenian statesman and military commander who, according to tradition, was made a general a staggering 45 times. A student of Plato and known as 'the Good', his political position was somewhat ambiguous...
Seleucus I Nicator
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Seleucus I Nicator

Seleucus I Nicator (l. c. 358-281 BCE, r. 305-281 BCE) was one of the generals of Alexander the Great (l. 356-323 BCE) who make up the group of Diadochi ("successors") who divided the vast Macedonian Empire between them after Alexander's...
Siege of Rhodes, 305-304 BCE
Imageby Ancient Warfare Magazine / Karwansaray Publishers

Siege of Rhodes, 305-304 BCE

Illustration of the Siege of Rhodes (305-304 BCE) by Zvonimir Grbasic. Courtesy of Ancient Warfare Magazine / Karwansaray Publishers.
Ten Famous & Not-so-Famous Same-Sex Couples in Ancient History
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

Ten Famous & Not-so-Famous Same-Sex Couples in Ancient History

History is recorded by individual human beings with their own beliefs and interests guiding what they choose to record, and, as such, many events and details may be omitted from the account of a certain event or the story of a great person’s...