Search Results: Perdiccas

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Battle of Hydaspes mosaic
Imageby Jorge António

Battle of Hydaspes mosaic

The representation of Alexander the Great, and the most emblematic scene of the Battle of Hydaspes in the triclinium floor of Medusa House. This proves to be a documentary source of enormous importance in the study of Late Antiquity elites...
The Delian League, Part 4: The Ten Years War (431/0-421/0 BCE)
Articleby Christopher Planeaux

The Delian League, Part 4: The Ten Years War (431/0-421/0 BCE)

This text is part of an article series on the Delian League. The fourth phase of the Delian League encompasses the first part of the Great Peloponnesian War, also referred to as the Ten Years War, sometimes called quite incorrectly The...
Amphipolis
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Amphipolis

Amphipolis, located on a plain in northern Macedonia near Mt. Pangaion and the river Strymon, was an Athenian colony founded c. 437 BCE on the older Thracian site of Ennea Hodoi. Thucydides relates that the Athenian general Hagnon so named...
Elephants in Hellenistic History & Art
Articleby Branko van Oppen

Elephants in Hellenistic History & Art

Elephants were thought of as fierce and frightful monsters in antiquity, very real though rarely seen until the Hellenistic period. They were deployed on the battlefield to strike terror into the enemy, however, since fear was considered...
Hippocrates
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Hippocrates

Hippocrates was born on the Greek island of Kos in the 5th century BCE, and he became the most famous physician in antiquity. He established a medical school on the island, wrote many treatises on medical matters, and is, through his systematic...
Jerash
Definitionby James Blake Wiener

Jerash

Jerash (aka Gerasa, Gerash or Gerasha) is the capital and the largest city of the Jerash Governorate in Jordan, but in ancient times it was one of the wealthiest and most cosmopolitan cities in the ancient Near East. Settled by humans as...
Epicurus
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Epicurus

Epicurus (341 BCE – 270 BCE) was an ancient Greek philosopher, the founder of the Epicurean school in Athens, who taught that "Pleasure is the principle and end to a happy life." He was a prolific writer, amassing 37 volumes...
Periander
Definitionby James Lloyd

Periander

Periander was the second tyrant of Corinth (d. c. 587 BCE); Diogenes Laertius only mentions that he was eighty when he died, meaning that he was probably born c. 667 BCE. His father Cypselus (r. 657-627 BCE), from whom the short-lived Cypselid...
The Life of Diogenes of Sinope in Diogenes Laertius
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

The Life of Diogenes of Sinope in Diogenes Laertius

Diogenes of Sinope (c. 404-323 BCE) was a Greek Cynic philosopher best known for holding a lantern to the faces of the citizens of Athens claiming he was searching for an honest man. He was most likely a student of the philosopher Antisthenes...
Ai Khanum, the Capital of Eucratides
Articleby Antoine Simonin

Ai Khanum, the Capital of Eucratides

Ai Khanum (also spelled Ai-Khanoum or Ay-Khanum, lit. “Lady Moon” in Uzbek), was founded in the 4th century BC, following the conquests of Alexander the Great and was one of the primary cities of the Greco-Bactrian kingdom...