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Maya Food & Agriculture
Articleby Mark Cartwright

Maya Food & Agriculture

For the Maya, reliable food production was so important to their well-being that they closely linked the agricultural cycle to astronomy and religion. Important rituals and ceremonies were held in honour of specialised workers; from beekeepers...
Temple of the Sun, Palenque
Imageby Alejandro Linares Garcia

Temple of the Sun, Palenque

The Temple of the Sun at the Maya city of Palenque, Mexico. The temple was built in the late 7th century CE as part of the complex known as the Group of the Cross by King K'an Bahlam.
Palace, Palenque
Imageby Alfred Diem

Palace, Palenque

The Palace building of Palenque. With the northern half and tower dating to c. 721 CE, the structure is one of the most complex in Maya architecture and its square tower is unique in Mesoamerican sites.
Maya Writing
Articleby Mark Cartwright

Maya Writing

The Maya hieroglyphic writing system was a sophisticated combination of pictographs directly representing objects and ideograms (glyphs) expressing more abstract concepts such as actions, ideas and syllabic sounds. Maya writing has survived...
Maya Religion
Definitionby Maria C. Gomez

Maya Religion

Maya religious beliefs are formed on the notion that virtually everything in the world contains k'uh, or sacredness. K'uh and k'uhul, similar terms which are used to explain the spirituality of all inanimate and animate things, describe the...
The Ball Game of Mesoamerica
Articleby Mark Cartwright

The Ball Game of Mesoamerica

The sport known simply as the Ball Game was played by all the major Mesoamerican civilizations and the impressive stone courts became a feature of many cities. More than just a game, it could have a religious significance and featured in...
The Mayan Pantheon: The Many Gods of the Maya
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

The Mayan Pantheon: The Many Gods of the Maya

The pantheon of the Maya is a vast collection of deities who were worshipped throughout the region which, today, comprises Yucatan, Quintana Roo, Campeche, Tabasco, and Chiapas in Mexico and southward through Guatemala, Belize, El Salvador...
The Maya Calendar and the End of the World: Why the one does not substantiate the other
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

The Maya Calendar and the End of the World: Why the one does not substantiate the other

The Popol Vuh recounts the story of twins who journeyed to Xibalba. For the Maya, their round of adventures serves as a metaphor for timeless, repeating cycles and for the regeneration of earth and all living things. – Gene S. Stuart, Mayanist...
National Geographic Live! - Palenque and the Ancient Maya World
Videoby National Geographic

National Geographic Live! - Palenque and the Ancient Maya World

Archaeologists and National Geographic grantees George and David Stuart offer keen insights into the art and culture of the Mayans.
Maya Religion: The Light That Came From Beside The Sea
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

Maya Religion: The Light That Came From Beside The Sea

The Mayan religious text, the Popol Vuh (known by many names, among them, The Light That Came From Beside The Sea) is the Quiche Maya story of creation translated into Spanish in the early 18th century CE by the missionary Francisco Ximenez...