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Lysander
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Lysander

Lysander (d. 395 BCE) was a Spartan statesman and general who famously defeated the Athenian navy at the Battle of Aigospotamoi in 405 BCE, which finally won the Peloponnesian War. Lysander gained a reputation for a fiery personality, daring...
Centurion
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Centurion

The centurion, or centurio in Latin, has become the most famous officer in the Roman army, and his experience and valour were indeed a crucial factor in maintaining order on the battlefield and ensuring Rome's military successes spanned over...
Tarquinia
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Tarquinia

Tarquinia (Etruscan name: Tarch'na or Tarch, Roman name: Tarquinii) is a town located on the western coast of central Italy which was an important Etruscan and then Roman settlement. It is famous today as the site of around 200 Etruscan tombs...
Ancient Greece Teaching Resource Bundle
Teaching Bundleby Patrick Goodman

Ancient Greece Teaching Resource Bundle

This Ancient Greece Teaching Resource Bundle is a collection of teaching resources that can be downloaded for free – no registration required. Our teaching resources and lesson plans are adapted to students' different levels of...
The Delian League, Part 3: From the Thirty Years Peace to the Start of the Ten Years War (445/4–431/0 BCE)
Articleby Christopher Planeaux

The Delian League, Part 3: From the Thirty Years Peace to the Start of the Ten Years War (445/4–431/0 BCE)

The third phase of the Delian League begins with the Thirty Years Peace between Athens and Sparta and ends with the start of the Ten Years War (445/4 – 431/0 BCE). The First Peloponnesian War, which effectively ended after the...
Draco's Law Code
Definitionby Antonios Loizides

Draco's Law Code

Draco was an aristocrat who in 7th century BCE Athens was handed the task of composing a new body of laws. We have no particular clues concerning his life and general biography and the only certainty is that, as an aristocrat and an educated...
Nemea
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Nemea

Nemea was a religious sanctuary in the northern Peloponnese of Greece where pan-Hellenic athletic games were held every two years from 573 BCE until 271 BCE, after which, the Games were definitively moved to Argos. Early Settlement...
The Parthenon Sculptures
Articleby Mark Cartwright

The Parthenon Sculptures

The extraordinary quality and quantity of the marble sculpture which adorned the 5th century BCE Parthenon in Athens made it the most richly decorated of all Greek temples. The sculpture, now mostly separated into the Parthenon Marbles (Elgin...
The Dexileos Stele: A Study of Aristocracy and Democracy in Greek Art
Articleby James Lloyd

The Dexileos Stele: A Study of Aristocracy and Democracy in Greek Art

The Dexileos Stele assesses the way that Athenian political thought penetrated all levels of society, showing the conflict that the aristocratic classes were faced with in trying to find their place within the Athenian Democracy. As a visual...
Antipater (Macedonian General)
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Antipater (Macedonian General)

Antipater (c. 399-319 BCE) was a Macedonian statesman and loyal lieutenant of both Alexander the Great and his father Philip II of Macedon. As a regent in Alexander's absence, Antipater subdued rebellions and mollified uprisings, proving...