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Etruscan Civilization
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Etruscan Civilization

The Etruscan civilization flourished in central Italy between the 8th and 3rd century BCE. The culture was renowned in antiquity for its rich mineral resources and as a major Mediterranean trading power. Much of its culture and even history...
Hellenistic Warfare
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Hellenistic Warfare

When Alexander the Great died in 323 BCE, he left behind an empire devoid of leadership. Without a named successor or heir, the old commanders simply divided the kingdom among themselves. For the next three decades, they fought a lengthy...
The Delian League, Part 4: The Ten Years War (431/0-421/0 BCE)
Articleby Christopher Planeaux

The Delian League, Part 4: The Ten Years War (431/0-421/0 BCE)

The fourth phase of the Delian League encompasses the first part of the Great Peloponnesian War, also referred to as the Ten Years War, sometimes called quite incorrectly The Archidamian War, and it ends with the Peace of Nicias (431/30 &ndash...
Philip II of Macedon
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Philip II of Macedon

Although he is often only remembered for being the father of Alexander the Great, Philip II of Macedon (reigned 359 BCE - 336 BCE) was an accomplished king and military commander in his own right, setting the stage for his son's victory...
Travel in the Ancient Greek World
Articleby Mark Cartwright

Travel in the Ancient Greek World

Travel opportunities within the ancient Greek world largely depended on status and profession; nevertheless, a significant proportion of the population could, and did, travel across the Mediterranean to sell their wares, skills, go on religious...
Ancient Olympic Games
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Ancient Olympic Games

The ancient Olympic Games were a sporting event held every four years at the sacred site of Olympia, in the western Peloponnese, in honour of Zeus, the supreme god of Greek religion. Involving participants and spectators from all over Greece...
Amazon Women
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Amazon Women

In Greek mythology, the Amazons were a race of warlike women noted for their riding skills, courage, and pride, who lived at the outer limits of the known world, sometimes specifically mentioned as the city of Themiskyra on the Black Sea...
Hestia
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Hestia

Hestia was the Greek virgin goddess of the hearth, home, and hospitality. In Greek mythology, she is the eldest daughter of Cronus and Rhea. In her role as a protector of the family and political community, sacrifices and offerings were regularly...
The Thirty Tyrants
Definitionby Christopher Planeaux

The Thirty Tyrants

The Thirty Tyrants (οἱ τριάκοντα τύραννοι) is a term first used by Polycrates in a speech praising Thrasybulus (Arist. Rhet. 1401a) to describe the brief 8-month...
Dodona
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Dodona

Dodona in Epirus, north-west Greece, lies in a valley on the eastern slopes of Mt. Tomaros and was famed throughout the ancient Greek world as the site of a great oracle of Zeus. The site was expanded in the Hellenistic period, and one of...