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Menelaus of Alexandria
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Menelaus of Alexandria

Menelaus of Alexandria was a Greek astronomer, scientist, and mathematician who lived around 100 CE. Menelaus made a significant and lasting contribution to the fields of astronomy, geometry, and trigonometry. His major work, the Spherics...
Reconstruction of Asclepeion of Epidaurus
Imageby Ancient History Magazine/ Karwansaray Publishers

Reconstruction of Asclepeion of Epidaurus

A reconstruction of the Temple of Asclepius in Epidaurus. Illustration by Julia Lillo.
Egyptian Medical Treatments
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

Egyptian Medical Treatments

The ancient Egyptians experienced the same wide array of disease that people do in the present day, but unlike most people in the modern era, they attributed the experience to supernatural causes. The common cold, for example, was prevalent...
Female Physicians in Ancient Egypt
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

Female Physicians in Ancient Egypt

A famous story from Greece relates how a young woman named Agnodice wished to become a doctor in Athens but found this forbidden. In fact, a woman practicing medicine in Athens in the 4th century BCE faced the death penalty. Refusing to give...
Ancient Greek Society
Articleby Mark Cartwright

Ancient Greek Society

Although ancient Greek Society was dominated by the male citizen, with his full legal status, right to vote, hold public office, and own property, the social groups which made up the population of a typical Greek city-state or polis were...
Seating of the Theatre of Epidaurus
Imageby Mark Cartwright

Seating of the Theatre of Epidaurus

The theatre of Epidaurus was first built in the 4th century BCE and is possibly the best preserved ancient Greek theatre. Extensions were made in the 2nd century BCE taking its capacity to 12,000.
Aqueduct
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Aqueduct

In antiquity, aqueducts transported water from one place to another, achieving a regular and controlled supply to a place that would not otherwise have received sufficient quantities. Consequently, aqueducts met basic needs such as the irrigation...
Archimedes
Definitionby Cristian Violatti

Archimedes

Archimedes (287-212 BCE) was a Greek mathematician and mechanical engineer, a pioneer in both fields, many centuries ahead of his contemporaries. Today he is best known for formulating Archimedes' Principle, also known as the law of buoyancy...
Nicolaus Copernicus
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Nicolaus Copernicus

Nicolaus Copernicus (1473-1543 CE) was a Polish astronomer who famously proposed that the Earth and other planets revolved around the Sun in a heliocentric system and not, as then widely thought, in a geocentric system where the Earth is...
Ancient Timekeeping
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Ancient Timekeeping

The passage of time has always been a preoccupation of human beings, whether it be a question of satisfying basic needs such as when to eat and sleep, the importance of seasons for migratory and agricultural purposes or a more sophisticated...
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