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Medieval Cures for the Black Death
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

Medieval Cures for the Black Death

The Black Death is the 19th-century CE term for the plague epidemic that ravaged Europe between 1347-1352 CE, killing an estimated 30 million people there and many more worldwide as it reached pandemic proportions. The name comes from the...
Effects of the Black Death on Europe
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

Effects of the Black Death on Europe

The outbreak of plague in Europe between 1347-1352 CE – known as the Black Death – completely changed the world of medieval Europe. Severe depopulation upset the socio-economic feudal system of the time but the experience of the...
The Mesopotamian Pantheon
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

The Mesopotamian Pantheon

The gods of the Mesopotamian region were not uniform in name, power, provenance or status in the hierarchy. Mesopotamian culture varied from region to region and, because of this, Marduk should not be regarded as King of the Gods in the same...
Dogs & Their Collars in Ancient Greece
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

Dogs & Their Collars in Ancient Greece

Dogs in ancient Greece are regularly depicted in art, on ceramics, in literature, and other written works as loyal companions, guardians, hunters, and even as great intuitive thinkers; all of these expressing the deep admiration the Greeks...
Thucydides on the Plague of Athens: Text & Commentary
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

Thucydides on the Plague of Athens: Text & Commentary

The Plague of Athens (429-426 BCE) struck the city, most likely, in 430 BCE before it was recognized as an epidemic and, before it was done, had claimed between 75,000-100,000 lives. Modern-day scholars believe it was most likely an outbreak...
The Early History of Clove, Nutmeg, & Mace
Articleby James Hancock

The Early History of Clove, Nutmeg, & Mace

The spices clove, nutmeg, and mace originated on only a handful of tiny islands in the Indonesian archipelago but came to have a dramatic, far-reaching impact on world trade. In antiquity, they became popular in the medicines of India and...
Armenian Medical Texts
Imageby James Blake Wiener

Armenian Medical Texts

This manuscript book contains the translated works of Hippocrates and Galen, and it is entitled "Passage of Works by Hippocrates and Galen." It was compiled by Amirdovlat Amasiatsi or "Amirdovlat of Amasia" (c. 1420-1496 CE) who wrote in...
Epidaurus
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Epidaurus

Epidaurus was an ancient religious site and settlement located on the fertile Argolid plain of the east Peloponnese in Greece. Blessed with a mild climate and natural springs, the sanctuary of Asclepius at Epidaurus was an important sacred...
Ancient Greek Science
Definitionby Cristian Violatti

Ancient Greek Science

The achievements of ancient Greek science were amongst the finest in antiquity. Building on Egyptian and Babylonian knowledge, figures such as Thales of Miletus, Pythagoras, and Aristotle developed ideas in mathematics, astronomy, and logic...
Syracusia
Definitionby Stella Nenova

Syracusia

The Syracusia was an ancient sailing vessel designed by Archimedes in the 3rd century BCE. She was fabled as being one of the largest ships ever built in antiquity and as having a sumptuous decor of exotic woods and marble along with towers...
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