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Search Results: Hannibal

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Marian Reforms
Articleby Philip Mathew

Marian Reforms

The Marian Reforms were a set of the reforms introduced to the Roman army in the late 2nd century BCE by Roman general and politician Gaius Marius (157-86 BCE). Through these reforms, the Roman army was transformed from a semi-professional...
Battle of Telamon
Articleby Ludwig Heinrich Dyck

Battle of Telamon

Ever since the 4th century BCE, the Gallic tribes of northern Italy clashed with the expanding Roman Republic. In 225 BCE, the Boii forged alliances with fellow Gallic tribes of northern Italy and with tribes from across the Alps. The pan-Gallic...
Interview: Numantia - Recreating the Ancient Iberian World
Interviewby James Blake Wiener

Interview: Numantia - Recreating the Ancient Iberian World

RECOTechnology is a small game-developer studio based in Madrid, Spain. Their latest video game - Numantia - allows players to explore the conflicts between the ancient Iberians and ancient Romans. James Blake Wiener of Ancient History Encyclopedia...
Rome's Response to the Spread of Christianity
Articleby Rebecca Denova

Rome's Response to the Spread of Christianity

During the 1st century CE, a sect of Jews in Jerusalem claimed that their teacher, Jesus of Nazareth, was the 'messiah' of Israel. 'Messiah' meant 'anointed one', or someone chosen by the God of Israel to lead when God would intervene in...
Roman Citizenship
Articleby Donald L. Wasson

Roman Citizenship

Citizenship is and always has been a valued possession of any individual. When one studies the majority of ancient empires one finds that the concept of citizenship, in any form, was non-existent. The people in these societies did not and...
Cicero & the Catiline Conspiracy
Articleby Donald L. Wasson

Cicero & the Catiline Conspiracy

The Roman Republic was in death's throes. Within a few short years, the “dictator for life” Julius Caesar would be assassinated, and, as a result, the government would descend into chaos. The consequence of a long civil war would...
Roman walls
Articleby Victor Labate

Roman walls

The many Roman walls still visible today throughout Europe and the Mediterranean, be they defensive walls such as the Servian Wall or house and monument walls, tell us a great deal about the evolution of Roman construction techniques. Roman...
Authority in Ancient Rome: Auctoritas, Potestas, Imperium, and the Paterfamilias
Articleby Jesse Sifuentes

Authority in Ancient Rome: Auctoritas, Potestas, Imperium, and the Paterfamilias

Authority in ancient Rome was complex, and as one can expect from Rome, full of tradition, myth, and awareness of their own storied history. Perhaps the ultimate authority was imperium, the power to command...
Diodorus Siculus' Account of the Life of Semiramis
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

Diodorus Siculus' Account of the Life of Semiramis

Semiramis is the semi-divine Warrior-Queen of Assyria, whose reign is most clearly documented by the Greek historian Diodorus Siculus (90-30 BCE) in his great work Bibliotheca Historica ("Historical Library") written over thirty...
Interview: Barry Strauss on Ten Caesars
Interviewby James Blake Wiener

Interview: Barry Strauss on Ten Caesars

Dr. Barry Strauss' Ten Caesars: Roman Emperors from Augustus to Constantine tells the epic story of the Roman Empire from its rise to its eastern reinvention, from Augustus, who founded the empire, to Constantine, who made it Christian and...