Search Results: Hagia Sophia

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Leo VI
Imageby Jose Luiz

Leo VI

A penitent Leo VI, Byzantine emperor 886-912 CE, from a mosaic in the Hagia Sophia, Istanbul.
Socrates
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Socrates

Socrates of Athens (l. c. 470/469-399 BCE) is among the most famous figures in world history for his contributions to the development of ancient Greek philosophy which provided the foundation for all of Western Philosophy. He is, in fact...
Philosophy
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Philosophy

The word philosophy comes from the Greek philo (love) and sophia (wisdom) and so is literally defined as “the love of wisdom”. More broadly understood, it is the study of the most basic and profound matters of human existence. Philosophical...
Jan Hus
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Jan Hus

Jan Hus (also John Huss, l. c. 1369-1415) was a Czech philosopher, priest, and theologian who, inspired by the work of John Wycliffe (l. 1330-1384) challenged the policies and practices of the medieval Church and so launched the Bohemian...
Lancelot
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Lancelot

Lancelot, also known as Sir Lancelot and Lancelot du Lac (“Lancelot of the Lake”) is the greatest knight of King Arthur's court and lover of Arthur's wife, Queen Guinevere, best known from Sir Thomas Malory's Le Morte D'Arthur (1469 CE...
Hussite Wars
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Hussite Wars

The Hussite Wars (1419 to c. 1434) were a series of conflicts fought in Bohemia (modern-day Czech Republic) between followers of the reformer Jan Hus and Catholic loyalists toward the end of the Bohemian Reformation (c. 1380 to c. 1436...
Kievan Rus
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Kievan Rus

Kievan Rus (862-1242 CE) was a medieval political federation located in modern-day Belarus, Ukraine, and part of Russia (the latter named for the Rus, a Scandinavian people). The name Kievan Rus is a modern-day (19th century CE) designation...
The Medieval Church
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

The Medieval Church

Religious practice in medieval Europe (c. 476-1500) was dominated and informed by the Catholic Church. The majority of the population was Christian, and "Christian" at this time meant "Catholic" as there was initially no other form of that...
Sacred Cakes in Ancient Greece
Articleby Nathalie Choubineh

Sacred Cakes in Ancient Greece

Sacred cakes in ancient Greece were baked loaves, biscuits, pastries, and sponges sweetened with honey (meli) and prepared as unburnt offerings to the gods and goddesses and other divine beings. Unburnt offerings were substitutes for or a...
Architecture in the Ancient World
Collectionby Mark Cartwright

Architecture in the Ancient World

One of the lasting contributions ancient cultures have made to modern life is architecture, both in terms of surviving monuments and their influence on contemporary buildings around the world. Ambitious rulers set up pyramids in Egypt and...
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