Search Results: Hagia Sophia

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Hagia Triada Minoan Settlement
Imageby Carole Raddato

Hagia Triada Minoan Settlement

The Minoan settlement of Hagia Triada archaeological site, Crete (1600-1450 BCE).
Mycenaean Agora at Hagia Triada, Crete
Imageby Carole Raddato

Mycenaean Agora at Hagia Triada, Crete

The Agora (marketplace) at the Minoan settlement of Hagia Triada (Crete) belonging to the Mycenaean era (1400-1100 BCE) with eight spacious rooms, probably shops, arranged behind a portico.
Basil I
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Basil I

Basil I was emperor of the Byzantine Empire from 867 to 886 CE and he founded the "Macedonian" dynasty which lasted for over 200 years. Basil was an Armenian from a humble background who had risen to become the second most powerful...
Byzantine Coinage
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Byzantine Coinage

The coinage of the Byzantine Empire continued that of its more ancient predecessors and functioned as a convenient method of payment for goods and services, especially to soldiers and officials, and as a means for people to pay their taxes...
Minoan Religious Procession on Hagia Triada Sarcophagus
Imageby ArchaiOptix

Minoan Religious Procession on Hagia Triada Sarcophagus

Minoan limestone sarcophagus, c. 1400 BCE. Heraklion Archaeological Museum, Crete. This painting appears on one of the two longer sides of the sarcophagus. It shows a sacrificial procession, part of a funerary ritual, with a woman...
Heraclius
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Heraclius

Heraclius (Herakleios) was emperor of the Byzantine Empire from 610 to 641 CE. He crushed the Persian empire and returned the looted True Cross to Jerusalem, but the second half of his reign was beset by intrigues and ecclesiastical controversies...
Hagia Sophia  537 CE
3D Imageby R. van den Berg

Hagia Sophia 537 CE

Reconstruction of the Hagia Sophia in Constantinople at its inauguration, December 27th 537 CE. To create this model, some artistic liberty was required. However, there is some documentation on which parts of the building were added or removed...
Byzantine-Armenian Relations
Articleby Mark Cartwright

Byzantine-Armenian Relations

The relationship between the Byzantine Empire and ancient Armenia was a constant and varied one with an equal mix of wars, occupations, treaties of friendship, mutual military aid, and cultural exchange. Regarded as a vital defence to the...
The Great Palace of Constantinople
Articleby Mark Cartwright

The Great Palace of Constantinople

The Great Palace of Constantinople was the magnificent residence of Byzantine emperors and their court officials which included a golden throne room with wondrous mechanical devices, reception halls, chapels, treasury, and gardens. In use...
Guinevere
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Guinevere

Guinevere is the Queen of Britain, wife of King Arthur, and lover of Sir Lancelot in the Arthurian Legends best known in their standardized form from Sir Thomas Malory's Le Morte D'Arthur (1469 CE). She first appears in Geoffrey of Monmouth's...