Search Results: Hagia Sophia

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Harvester Vase
Imageby Olaf Tausch

Harvester Vase

The Minoan stone vessel known as the 'Harvester Vase', from Hagia Triada on Crete, 1500-1450 BCE. The vase is carved from serpentine and was originally covered in gold leaf. The scenes in relief depict a sowing festival and the vase was probably...
1453: The Fall of Constantinople
Articleby Mark Cartwright

1453: The Fall of Constantinople

The city of Constantinople (modern Istanbul) was founded by Roman emperor Constantine I in 324 CE and it acted as the capital of the Eastern Roman Empire, or Byzantine Empire as it has later become known, for well over 1,000 years. Although...
The Hippodrome of Constantinople
Articleby Mark Cartwright

The Hippodrome of Constantinople

The Hippodrome of Constantinople was an arena used for chariot racing throughout the Byzantine period. First built during the reign of Roman emperor Septimius Severus in the early 3rd century CE, the structure was made more grandiose by emperor...
Saint Cyril
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Saint Cyril

Saint Cyril (aka Kyrillos and Constantine the Philosopher, d. 867 CE) was a Byzantine linguist, teacher, scholar and missionary who famously preached Christianity to the Slavs in Moravia with his brother Methodius during the 9th century CE...
Mystras
Definitionby Michael Goodyear

Mystras

The city of Mystras (or Mistras) in southern Greece was the provincial capital of the Byzantine Despotate of the Morea from the 13th through the 15th centuries CE. It was founded in 1249 CE by William II of Villehadouin, and it served as...
King Arthur
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

King Arthur

King Arthur is among the most famous literary characters of all time. The Arthurian legend of the Knights of the Round Table, Camelot, the Quest for the Holy Grail, the love affair of Lancelot and Guinevere, and the wizard Merlin have informed...
Byzantine Chapel at Hagia Triada, Crete
Imageby Carole Raddato

Byzantine Chapel at Hagia Triada, Crete

The Byzantine single-aisled chapel of Agios Georgios lying over the remains of a Minoan villa at the Hagia Triada archaeological site in southern Crete. The church was built during the Venetian period at the beginning of the 14th century...
Sophia-Wisdom, Celsus Library, Ephesos
Imageby Mark Cartwright

Sophia-Wisdom, Celsus Library, Ephesos

A detail of the facade of the Celsus Library in Ephesos (c. 117 CE). The statue represents wisdom (sophia), an attribute associated with the former proconsul Celsus to whom the building was dedicated.
St. Sophia's Cathedral, Novgorod
Imageby Людмила Ф-С

St. Sophia's Cathedral, Novgorod

St. Sophia's Cathedral, Novgorod, Russia. It was first built c. 1037 CE by the Kievan Rus king Yaroslav I (c. 1019-1054 CE)
Hagia Triada Sarcophagus
Imageby Carole Raddato

Hagia Triada Sarcophagus

The Hagia Triada sarcophagus is a Late Bronze Age (1400 BCE) 137 cm-long limestone sarcophagus covered in plaster and painted in fresco and combining features of Minoan and Mycenaean style. The painted frieze shows all the stages of the sacred...