Search Results: Greek Warfare

Search

Dogs & Their Collars in Ancient Greece
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

Dogs & Their Collars in Ancient Greece

Dogs in ancient Greece are regularly depicted in art, on ceramics, in literature, and other written works as loyal companions, guardians, hunters, and even as great intuitive thinkers; all of these expressing the deep admiration the Greeks...
Battle of Thermopylae 480 BCE
Imageby Dept. of History, US Military Academy

Battle of Thermopylae 480 BCE

A map indicating the location and military positions taken in the Battle of Thermopylae in 480 BCE between the Persian invading forces of Xerxes I against a small Greek force led by Spartan king Leonidas. Defending the pass for three days...
Greek Trireme in Battle
Imageby The Creative Assembly

Greek Trireme in Battle

An artist's impression of what a Greek trireme warship may have looked like.
Greek Warriors Stele
Imageby James Blake Wiener

Greek Warriors Stele

A marble stele depicting two Greek warriors. Taman Peninsula, 4th century BCE. (Pushkin Museum, Moscow)
Fallen Greek Hoplite
Imageby The Creative Assembly

Fallen Greek Hoplite

An artist's impression of what a fallen Greek hoplite may have looked like.
Greek Helmet with Myrtle Leaves
Imageby Mark Cartwright

Greek Helmet with Myrtle Leaves

A depiction of a Greek Corinthian helmet with myrtle leaves. From an Attic black-figure pottery vessel from Phalero, 575-550 BCE. (National Archaeological Museum, Athens)
Athena
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Athena

Goddess of wisdom, war and the crafts, and favourite daughter of Zeus, Athena was, perhaps, the wisest, most courageous, and certainly the most resourceful of the Olympian gods. Zeus was told that his son would take his throne from him...
Lyre
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Lyre

The lyre was a stringed musical instrument played by the ancient Greeks and was probably the most important and well-known instrument in the Greek world. It was closely related to the other stringed instruments: the chelys which was made...
Theogony
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Theogony

The Theogony is an 8th-century BCE didactic and instructional poem, credited to the Greek poet Hesiod. The Theogony was, at first, not actually written down, rather, it was part of a rich oral tradition which only achieved written form decades...
Magna Graecia
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Magna Graecia

Magna Graecia (Megalē Hellas) refers to the coastal areas of southern Italy which were colonized by various ancient Greek city-states from the 8th to 5th centuries BCE. Sicily, although also a region of Greek colonization, is not usually...