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Greek Astronomy
Definitionby Cristian Violatti

Greek Astronomy

Astronomy is an area where the Greeks displayed a remarkable talent. Observational astronomy, which was the main form of astronomy elsewhere, was taken a step further in Greece: they attempted to build a model of the universe that could account...
Ancient Greek Coinage
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Ancient Greek Coinage

The coinage of ancient Greece has given us some of the most recognisable images from antiquity as they were stamped with designs to proudly declare the identity of the city which minted them and guarantee their value. One of the great archaeological...
A Visual Who's Who of Greek Mythology
Articleby Mark Cartwright

A Visual Who's Who of Greek Mythology

Achilles The hero of the Trojan War, leader of the Myrmidons, slayer of Hector and Greece's greatest warrior, who sadly came unstuck when Paris sent a flying arrow guided by Apollo, which caught him in his only weak spot, his heel...
A Visual Glossary of Greek Pottery
Articleby Mark Cartwright

A Visual Glossary of Greek Pottery

Alabastron (pl. alabastra) - a small jar for storing perfumes, named after the material (alabaster) the first examples were made from. They were often carried by a string looped around the neck of the vessel. Amphora (pl. amphorae...
Delian League
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Delian League

The Delian League (or Athenian League) was an alliance of Greek city-states led by Athens. The League was formed in 478 BCE to liberate eastern Greek cities from Persian rule and as a defence to possible revenge attacks from Persia following...
Lysander
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Lysander

Lysander (d. 395 BCE) was a Spartan statesman and general who famously defeated the Athenian navy at the Battle of Aigospotamoi in 405 BCE, which finally won the Peloponnesian War. Lysander gained a reputation for a fiery personality, daring...
Battle of Alesia
Articleby Donald L. Wasson

Battle of Alesia

The Battle of Alesia was a decisive Roman victory in Julius Caesar's Gallic Wars in September 52 BCE. Roman commander Julius Caesar (100-44 BCE) and his legions faced a united Gallic army under the command of Vercingetorix (82-46 BCE), chief...
Comedy & Tragedy: the Drama of Greek Theatre
Collectionby Mark Cartwright

Comedy & Tragedy: the Drama of Greek Theatre

Greek theatre likely sprang from the lyrical performance of ancient epic poetry and the rituals performed in the worship of the god Dionysos where goats were sacrificed and participants wore masks. From the 6th century BCE, Greek tragedy...
Theatre of Dionysos Eleuthereus
Articleby Mark Cartwright

Theatre of Dionysos Eleuthereus

The theatre of Dionysos Eleuthereus on the south slope of the acropolis of Athens was first built in the 6th century BCE. Modified and expanded over the centuries, it is the oldest Greek theatre and is the site where some of the most famous...
The Relationship Between the Greek Symposium & Poetry
Articleby Elaine Sanderson

The Relationship Between the Greek Symposium & Poetry

The Ancient Greek symposium is often considered an important part of Greek culture, a place where the elite drank, feasted and indulged in sometimes decadent activities. Although such practices were present in symposia, the writing and performance...
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