Search Results: Greek Sculpture

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Kore
Imageby Mark Cartwright

Kore

Kore from the Athenian Acropolis, late 6th century BCE. (National Museum, Athens)
Hercules and Atlas
Imageby Mark Cartwright

Hercules and Atlas

Metope from the east side of the temple of Zeus, Olympia. Here Hercules holds the Earth on his shoulders with the aid of Athena, on the right Atlas gives the Apples of the Hesperides. (470-460 BCE) Olympia Archaeological Museum.
Helen of Troy
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Helen of Troy

Helen of Troy (sometimes called Helen of Sparta) is a figure from Greek mythology whose elopement with (or abduction by) the Trojan prince Paris sparked off the Trojan War. Helen was the wife of Menelaus, the king of Sparta, and considered...
Meleager
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Meleager

Meleager (Greek: Meleagros) is a hero from Greek mythology who famously led an expedition to kill the Calydonian boar which was terrorizing the kingdom of Oeneus in Aetolia in central-western Greece. Appearing in Homer's Iliad and the later...
Nike
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Nike

The ancient Greek goddess Nike was the personification of the ideal of victory. Such personifications of ideal terms were common in ancient Greek culture; other examples include Wisdom, Knowledge, and Justice. Unlike other gods in the Greek...
The Arch of Titus, Rome
Articleby Mark Cartwright

The Arch of Titus, Rome

The Arch of Titus is a Roman Triumphal Arch which was erected by Domitian in c. 81 CE at the foot of the Palatine hill on the Via Sacra in the Forum Romanum, Rome. It commemorates the victories of his father Vespasian and brother Titus in...
Hercules & The Cretan Bull
Imageby Mark Cartwright

Hercules & The Cretan Bull

Metope from the west side of the Temple of Zeus, Olympia. Here Hercules tames the Cretan Bull. (470-460 BCE) Olympia Archaeological Museum.
Symposium
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Symposium

The symposium (or symposion) was an important part of ancient Greek culture from the 7th century BCE and was a party held in a private home where Greek males gathered to drink, eat and sing together. Various topics were also discussed such...
Prometheus Bound
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Prometheus Bound

The Greek dramatist Aeschylus (c. 525 - c. 456 BCE) is considered one of the greatest tragic playwrights of his generation. He is often referred to as the “Father of Greek Tragedy.” Older than both Sophocles and Euripides, he...
Hipparchus of Nicea
Definitionby Cristian Violatti

Hipparchus of Nicea

Hipparchus of Nicea (190 BCE - 120 BCE) was an ancient Greek mathematician, astronomer and geographer, regarded by many historians as a scientist of the highest quality and possibly the greatest astronomical genius among the ancient Greeks...
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