Search Results: Greek Sculpture

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The Seven Wonders
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

The Seven Wonders

The Seven Wonders of the Ancient World were: the Great Pyramid of Giza, Egypt the Hanging Gardens of Babylon the Statue of Zeus at Olympia, Greece the Temple of Artemis at Ephesus the Mausoleum at Halicarnassus the Colossus...
Boxer of Quirinal
Imageby Irene Fanizza

Boxer of Quirinal

The bronze Boxer of Quirinal, also known as the Terme Boxer, is a Hellenistic Greek sculpture dated around 330 BCE of a sitting boxer with Caestus, a type of leather hand-wrap, in the collection of the National Museum of Rome. It is one of...
Ajax [Play]
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Ajax [Play]

Ajax is a play written by the 5th-century BCE Greek poet and dramatist Sophocles. Although Sophocles wrote at least 120 plays, only seven have survived. Of his surviving plays, the best-known is Oedipus Rex (Oedipus the King) - part of a...
Centaur
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Centaur

A centaur was a creature from Greek mythology which was half-man and half-horse. The head, arms and torso of a centaur were human and joined at the waist to the body and legs of a horse. They represented barbarism and unbridled chaos and...
The Children of Heracles
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

The Children of Heracles

The Children of Heracles (Heraclidae) is one of Euripides' lesser known and least popular works, as is the myth surrounding the tragedy play. Its date is also uncertain, possibly written in the late 430s or early 420s BCE. The play revolves...
Greek Vase Painting of an Artist at Work
Imageby Metropolitan Museum of Art

Greek Vase Painting of an Artist at Work

Red-figure vase depicting an artist painting a statue of Hercules, identified by his club and lion-skin cape. Greek and Roman statues were frequently painted in Antiquity, to impart a more impressive and life-like appearance. Images of artists...
Poseidon
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Poseidon

Poseidon was the Greek god of the sea and rivers, creator of storms and floods, and the bringer of earthquakes and destruction. He was perhaps the most disruptive of all the ancient gods but he was not always a negative force. He was a protector...
The Diskobolos (Discus Thrower)
Imageby Mary Harrsch (Photographed at the Portland Art Museum)

The Diskobolos (Discus Thrower)

The Diskobolos or Discus Thrower, 2nd century CE. Roman copy of a 450-440 BCE Greek bronze by Myron recovered from Emperor Hadrian's Villa in Tivoli, Italy. (British Museum, London)
The Great Sphinx of Giza
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

The Great Sphinx of Giza

The Great Sphinx of Giza is the most instantly recognizable statue associated with ancient Egypt and among the most famous in the world. The sculpture, of a recumbent lion with the head of an Egyptian king, was carved out of limestone on...
Proclus
Definitionby Celina Bebenek

Proclus

Proclus of Athens (c. 412-485 CE) was a prolific Platonic philosopher whose main aim was the seemingly impossible task of defending traditional Greek polytheism at the time when his contemporary culture was almost completely dominated by...
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