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Ten Noble and Notorious Women of Ancient Greece
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

Ten Noble and Notorious Women of Ancient Greece

Women in ancient Greece, outside of Sparta, had almost no rights and no political or legal power. Even so, some women broke through the social and cultural restrictions to make their mark on history. All of the women did so at great personal...
Plato's Lie In The Soul
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

Plato's Lie In The Soul

The Greek philosopher Plato (l. c. 428-348 BCE), in Book II of his Republic, addresses the problem of how one knows that one's beliefs are true. His line of thought raises questions such as, 'How do you know whether your most deeply-held...
Yin and Yang
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Yin and Yang

The principle of Yin and Yang is that all things exist as inseparable and contradictory opposites, for example, female-male, dark-light and old-young. The pairs of equal opposites attract and complement each other. The principle dates from...
Xenophanes of Colophon
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Xenophanes of Colophon

Xenophanes of Colophon (l. c. 570 - c. 478 BCE) was a Greek philosopher born fifty miles north of Miletus, a city famed for the birth of philosophy and home to the first Western philosopher, Thales of Miletus (l. c. 585 BCE). He is considered...
The Life and Thought of Zeno of Citium in Diogenes Laertius
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

The Life and Thought of Zeno of Citium in Diogenes Laertius

Zeno of Citium (c. 336 – 265 BCE) was the founder of the Stoic School of philosophy in Athens, which taught that the Logos (Universal Reason) was the greatest good in life and living in accordance with reason was the meaning of life...
Greek Alphabet
Definitionby Cristian Violatti

Greek Alphabet

The Greek alphabet is the writing system developed in Greece which first appears in the archaeological record during the 8th century BCE. This was not the first writing system that was used to write Greek: several centuries before the Greek...
Heraclitus of Ephesus
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Heraclitus of Ephesus

Heraclitus of Ephesus (l. c. 500 BCE) was one of the early Pre-Socratic philosophers who, like the others, sought to identify the First Cause for the creation of the world. He rejected earlier theories such as air and water and claimed that...
Ancient Greek Dance
Definitionby Nathalie Choubineh

Ancient Greek Dance

In ancient Greece, dance had a significant presence in everyday life. The Greeks not only danced on many different occasions, but they also recognized several non-performative activities such as ball-playing or rhythmic physical exercise...
Zeno of Citium
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Zeno of Citium

Zeno of Citium (l. c. 336 – 265 BCE) was the founder of the Stoic School of philosophy in Athens which taught that the Logos (Universal Reason) was the greatest good in life and living in accordance with reason was the purpose of human life...
Ancient Greece Teaching Resource Bundle
Teaching Bundleby Patrick Goodman

Ancient Greece Teaching Resource Bundle

This Ancient Greece Teaching Resource Bundle is a collection of teaching resources that can be downloaded for free – no registration required. Our teaching resources and lesson plans are adapted to students' different levels of...
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