Search Results: Greek Mythology

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Roman Literature
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Roman Literature

The Roman Empire and its predecessor the Roman Republic produced an abundance of celebrated literature; poetry, comedies, dramas, histories, and philosophical tracts; the Romans avoided tragedies. Much of it survives to this day. However...
Greek Mathematics
Articleby Cristian Violatti

Greek Mathematics

The mathematicians of ancient Greece made a hugely significant contribution to world thought and all practical subjects which depend on that intellectual basis, from geometry to engineering, astronomy to design. Influenced initially by...
Furies
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Furies

The Furies (or Erinyes, sing. Erinys) were creatures from Greek mythology who exacted divine retribution from those guilty of wrong-doing. Crimes which were especially likely to incur their wrath were those involving one's family and anything...
Battle of Salamis
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Battle of Salamis

The Battle of Salamis was a naval battle between Greek and Persian forces in the Saronic Gulf, Greece in September 480 BCE. The Greeks had recently lost the Battle of Thermopylae and drawn the naval Battle at Artemision, both in August 480...
Greek Astronomy
Definitionby Cristian Violatti

Greek Astronomy

Astronomy is an area where the Greeks displayed a remarkable talent. Observational astronomy, which was the main form of astronomy elsewhere, was taken a step further in Greece: they attempted to build a model of the universe that could account...
Persephone
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Persephone

Persephone (aka Kore) was the Greek goddess of agriculture and vegetation, especially grain, and the wife of Hades, with whom she rules the Underworld. An important element of the Eleusinian Mysteries and the Thesmophoria festival, the goddess...
Medusa
Definitionby Brittany Garcia

Medusa

Medusa was one of three sisters born to Phorcys and Ceto known as the Gorgons. According to Hesiod's Theogony, the Gorgons were the sisters of the Graiai and lived in the utmost place towards the night by the Hesperides beyond Oceanus. Later...
Siren
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Siren

Sirens were creatures from Greek mythology which enticed sailors to their destruction with their irresistibly beautiful singing. Their most famous appearance in literature is in Homer's Odyssey where the hero Odysseus, on his long voyage...
Women in Ancient Greece
Articleby Mark Cartwright

Women in Ancient Greece

Women in the ancient Greek world had few rights in comparison to male citizens. Unable to vote, own land, or inherit, a woman's place was in the home and her purpose in life was the rearing of children. That is a general description and when...
Andromache
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Andromache

Andromache is a Greek tragedy written by Euripides (c. 484- 407 BCE), one of only 19 plays (out of 92) to survive. The play is actually in two parts, and like Sophocles' Women of Trachis, it has no central character. The first part of the...
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