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Statue of Asklepios
Imageby Nina Aldin Thune

Statue of Asklepios

Statue of Asclepius, the Greek God of medicine, holding the symbolic Rod of Asclepius with its coiled serpent. The Glypotek, Copenhagen.
Hygieia, Palazzo Altemps
Imageby Mark Cartwright

Hygieia, Palazzo Altemps

A Pentelic marble bust of Hygieia, the Greek and Roman goddess of medicine and healing. 2nd century CE. (Palazzo Altemps, Rome)
Ancient Greek Music
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Ancient Greek Music

Music (or mousike) was an integral part of life in the ancient Greek world, and the term covered not only music but also dance, lyrics, and the performance of poetry. A wide range of instruments was used to perform music which was played...
Magic in Ancient Greece
Articleby Mark Cartwright

Magic in Ancient Greece

For the Greeks magic (mageia or goeteia) was a wide-ranging topic which involved spells and evil prayers (epoidai), curse tablets (katadesmoi), enhancing drugs and deadly poisons (pharmaka), amulets (periapta) and powerful love potions (philtra...
Greek Theatre Architecture
Articleby Mark Cartwright

Greek Theatre Architecture

The ancient Greeks built open-air theatres where the public could watch the performances of Greek comedy, tragedy, and satyr plays. They then exported the idea to their colonies throughout the Aegean so that theatres became a typical feature...
The Early History of Clove, Nutmeg, & Mace
Articleby James Hancock

The Early History of Clove, Nutmeg, & Mace

The spices clove, nutmeg, and mace originated on only a handful of tiny islands in the Indonesian archipelago but came to have a dramatic, far-reaching impact on world trade. In antiquity, they became popular in the medicines of India and...
Ancient Greek Sculpture
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Ancient Greek Sculpture

The sculpture of ancient Greece from 800 to 300 BCE took inspiration from Egyptian and Near Eastern monumental art, and evolved into a uniquely Greek vision of the art form. Greek artists captured the human form in a way never before seen...
Travel in the Ancient Greek World
Articleby Mark Cartwright

Travel in the Ancient Greek World

Travel opportunities within the ancient Greek world largely depended on status and profession; nevertheless, a significant proportion of the population could, and did, travel across the Mediterranean to sell their wares, skills, go on religious...
The Plague at Athens, 430-427 BCE
Articleby John Horgan

The Plague at Athens, 430-427 BCE

In the second year of the Peloponnesian War, 430 BCE, an outbreak of plague erupted in Athens. The illness would persist throughout scattered parts of Greece and the eastern Mediterranean until finally dying out in 426 BCE. The origin of...
Greek Mythology
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Greek Mythology

Greek mythology was used as a means to explain the environment in which humankind lived, the natural phenomena they witnessed and the passing of time through the days, months, and seasons. Greek myths were also intricately connected to religion...
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