Search Results: Greek Medicine

Search

Meleager
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Meleager

Meleager (Greek: Meleagros) is a hero from Greek mythology who famously led an expedition to kill the Calydonian boar which was terrorizing the kingdom of Oeneus in Aetolia in central-western Greece. Appearing in Homer's Iliad and the later...
Oedipus at Colonus
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Oedipus at Colonus

Oedipus at Colonus was the third play of the Oedipus trilogy written by the great Greek tragedian Sophocles (c. 496 - c. 406 BCE). Although written in the years prior to his death, it would finally be presented by his son Iophon at a dramatic...
Pindar
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Pindar

Pindar (c. 518 - c. 448/7 BCE) was an ancient Greek lyric poet, probably the greatest of his time. His works have been divided into 17 books of different types of poetry, but only those containing 44 choral victory songs composed for the...
Samothrace
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Samothrace

Samothrace (Samothrake) is a Greek island in the northern Aegean which was prominent from the Classical period as a member of the Delian League. Its greatest claim to fame was as a cult centre favoured by Macedon and visited by pilgrims from...
Women of Trachis
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Women of Trachis

Women of Trachis is a Greek tragedy, one of Sophocles' (c. 496 BCE - c. 406 BCE) lesser-known works, the only one that does not deal with the aftermath of the Trojan War, rather it is concerned with the death of the Greek hero Heracles (or...
Assyria
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Assyria

Assyria was the region located in the ancient Near East which, under the Neo-Assyrian Empire, reached from Mesopotamia (modern-day Iraq) through Asia Minor (modern Turkey) and down through Egypt. The empire began modestly at the city of Ashur...
Love, Sex, & Marriage in Ancient Greece
Articleby Ollie Wells

Love, Sex, & Marriage in Ancient Greece

Love, sex, and marriage in ancient Greece are portrayed in Greek literature as distinct, yet closely intertwined, elements of life. For many upper-class men, marriages did not take place for love, and other relationships, be it with men or...
Thespis, Athens, and The Origins of Greek Drama: Crash Course Theater #2
Videoby CrashCourse

Thespis, Athens, and The Origins of Greek Drama: Crash Course Theater #2

This week on Crash Course Theater, Mike is acting like theater started in Greece. Well, for the western theater, this is true. The earliest recorded drama in the west arose in Athen, and these early plays grew out or religious ritual. Namely...
The Delian League, Part 1: Origins Down to the Battle of Eurymedon (480/79-465/4 BCE)
Articleby Christopher Planeaux

The Delian League, Part 1: Origins Down to the Battle of Eurymedon (480/79-465/4 BCE)

This text is part of an article series on the Delian League. The modern term Delian League refers to the primarily maritime συμμᾰχία or symmachy (offensive-defensive alliance) among various Greek poleis, which emerged after the second...
Ptolemaic Dynasty
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Ptolemaic Dynasty

The Ptolemaic dynasty controlled Egypt for almost three centuries (305 – 30 BCE), eventually falling to the Romans. Oddly, while they ruled Egypt, they never became Egyptian. Instead, they isolated themselves in the capital city of Alexandria...
Membership