Search Results: Greek Medicine

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Daily Life in Ancient Greece
Collectionby Mark Cartwright

Daily Life in Ancient Greece

The ancient Greeks kept themselves busy and there were plenty of chores, distractions and entertainments available to keep daily life varied. Shopping in the markets of the agora, performing jury service, watching sporting events or listening...
Doctors, Diseases and Deities: Epidemic Crises and Medicine in Ancient Rome
Videoby BiblicalArchaeology

Doctors, Diseases and Deities: Epidemic Crises and Medicine in Ancient Rome

In this lecture presented at The Explorers Club in New York, BAS Director of Educational Programs Sarah Yeomans examines a recently excavated, as-yet unpublished archaeological site that has substantially contributed to our understanding...
Magic and Medicine: The casebooks of history's most notorious astrologer doctors
Videoby Cambridge University

Magic and Medicine: The casebooks of history's most notorious astrologer doctors

A ten-year project to study and digitise some 80,000 cases recorded by two famous astrological physicians has opened a wormhole into the everyday worries and desires of people who lived 400 years ago.
Greek World Heritage Sites
Articleby Heinrich Hall

Greek World Heritage Sites

Greece, the 'cradle of western civilization', is home to a large number of spectacular sites from the ancient world, several of which have been placed on the UNESCO World Heritage List. These sites of great historical importance, interest...
Menelaus of Alexandria
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Menelaus of Alexandria

Menelaus of Alexandria was a Greek astronomer, scientist, and mathematician who lived around 100 CE. Menelaus made a significant and lasting contribution to the fields of astronomy, geometry, and trigonometry. His major work, the Spherics...
Famous Grammarians & Poets of the Byzantine Empire
Articleby Helene Perdicoyianni-Paleologou

Famous Grammarians & Poets of the Byzantine Empire

In the wake of the downfall of the Western Roman Empire and the intellectual collapse of Athens, Byzantine scholars engaged in preserving the Classical Greek language and its literature. Thus they became the guardians of a vanished culture...
Iphigenia in Aulis
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Iphigenia in Aulis

Iphigenia in Aulis (or at Aulis) was written by Euripides, the youngest and most popular of the trilogy of great Greek tragedians. The play was based on the well-known myth surrounding the sacrifice of Agamemnon and Clytemnestra's daughter...
Hipparchia the Cynic: Devoted Wife, Mother, & Outspoken Greek Philosopher
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

Hipparchia the Cynic: Devoted Wife, Mother, & Outspoken Greek Philosopher

Cynic philosopher, wife of Crates of Thebes (l. c. 360 – 280 BCE), and mother of his children, Hipparchia of Maroneia (l. c. 350 – 280 BCE) defied social norms in order to live her beliefs. She is all the more impressive in that she taught...
Sicilian Temples (Greek Metrology)
Articleby Denitsa Dzhigova

Sicilian Temples (Greek Metrology)

Characteristics of Sicilian Archaic Temples The large dimensions of the components, the presence of a propteron, an adyton, and other specific elements of the plan and elevation speak for an originally very autonomous development of...
Agnodice
Imageby Missvain

Agnodice

Engraving of Agnodice, ancient Greek practitioner of medicine.
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