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Orpheus
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Orpheus

Orpheus is a figure from ancient Greek mythology, most famous for his virtuoso ability in playing the lyre or kithara. His music could charm the wild animals of the forest, and even streams would pause and trees bend a little closer to hear...
The Children of Heracles
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

The Children of Heracles

The Children of Heracles (Heraclidae) is one of Euripides' lesser known and least popular works, as is the myth surrounding the tragedy play. Its date is also uncertain, possibly written in the late 430s or early 420s BCE. The play revolves...
Battle of Thermopylae
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Battle of Thermopylae

Thermopylae is a mountain pass near the sea in northern Greece which was the site of several battles in antiquity, the most famous being that between Persians and Greeks in August 480 BCE. Despite being greatly inferior in numbers, the Greeks...
Innovations & Architecture in Ancient Rome
Quizby Marion Wadowski

Innovations & Architecture in Ancient Rome

Innovations Innovation architecture roman ancient Rome Aqueducts Bridges Basilicas Roman baths Temples Theatres Amphitheatres Triumphal Arches The Horrea Corinthian Doric Ionic Patronage
Roman Science
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Roman Science

The Romans assimilated earlier Greek science for their own purposes, evaluating and then accepting or rejecting that which was most useful, much as they did in other fields such as warfare, art, and theatre. This assimilation of Greek thought...
Tower of the Winds
Articleby Mark Cartwright

Tower of the Winds

The Tower of the Winds, also known as the Clock of Andronicus Cyrrhestes, is a timekeeping tower on the eastern side of the Roman agora of Athens. Built in the 2nd century BCE, it once had nine sundials and contained a large water clock...
Eratosthenes
Definitionby Cristian Violatti

Eratosthenes

Eratosthenes (276-195 BCE) was an ancient Greek Alexandrian scholar, native of Cyrene, who attained distinction in many fields including philosophy, mathematics, astronomy and history. However, it was in geography where he proved to be more...
Caryatid
Imageby Mark Cartwright

Caryatid

Caryatids of the 5th century BCE Erechtheion on the Athenian Acropolis.
Amazon Women
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Amazon Women

In Greek mythology, the Amazons were a race of warlike women noted for their riding skills, courage, and pride, who lived at the outer limits of the known world, sometimes specifically mentioned as the city of Themiskyra on the Black Sea...
Proclus
Definitionby Celina Bebenek

Proclus

Proclus of Athens (c. 412-485 CE) was a prolific Platonic philosopher whose main aim was the seemingly impossible task of defending traditional Greek polytheism at the time when his contemporary culture was almost completely dominated by...
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