Search Results: Greek Warfare

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Greek Helmet with Myrtle Leaves
Imageby Mark Cartwright

Greek Helmet with Myrtle Leaves

A depiction of a Greek Corinthian helmet with myrtle leaves. From an Attic black-figure pottery vessel from Phalero, 575-550 BCE. (National Archaeological Museum, Athens)
The Bar-Kochba Revolt
Definitionby Benjamin Kerstein

The Bar-Kochba Revolt

The Bar Kochba Revolt (132–136 CE) was the third and final war between the Jewish people and the Roman Empire. It followed a long period of tension and violence, marked by the first Jewish uprising of 66-70 CE, which ended with the destruction...
Warrior Women of the World of Ancient Macedon
Articleby David Grant

Warrior Women of the World of Ancient Macedon

The 8th November is celebrated as Archangels Day in Greece, but on that November day in 1977 CE something remarkable happened: an excavation team led by Professor Manolis Andronikos were roped down into the eerie gloom of an unlooted Macedonian-styled...
Achilles
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Achilles

Achilles is a figure from Greek mythology and literature and star of the Trojan War. Leader of the fearsome Myrmidons, sacker of cities, and slayer of Hector, godlike Achilles was quite simply invincible in battle. Only the divine intervention...
Elephants in Hellenistic History & Art
Articleby Branko van Oppen

Elephants in Hellenistic History & Art

Elephants were thought of as fierce and frightful monsters in antiquity, very real though rarely seen until the Hellenistic period. They were deployed on the battlefield to strike terror into the enemy, however, since fear was considered...
Viking Ships
Definitionby Emma Groeneveld

Viking Ships

Viking ships were built by the Scandinavians during the Viking Age (c. 790 CE - c. 1100 CE) and were used both within Scandinavia and beyond for purposes ranging from being the most important means of transport to trade and warfare. Viking...
Hippocrates
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Hippocrates

Hippocrates was born on the Greek island of Kos in the 5th century BCE, and he became the most famous physician in antiquity. He established a medical school on the island, wrote many treatises on medical matters, and is, through his systematic...
Battle of Issus
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Battle of Issus

The Battle of Issus, on 5 November 333 BCE, was Alexander the Great's second battle against the Persian army and the first direct engagement with King Darius III, near the village of Issus in southern modern-day Turkey. It was a major victory...
Temple of Artemis at Ephesus
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Temple of Artemis at Ephesus

The Temple of Artemis at Ephesus was located on the western coast of Asia Minor (modern Turkey) and built in the 6th century BCE. Such was its tremendous size, double the dimensions of other Greek temples including the Parthenon, that it...
Sophocles
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Sophocles

Sophocles of Kolōnos (c. 496 - c. 406 BCE) was one of the most famous and celebrated writers of tragedy plays in ancient Greece and his surviving works, written throughout the 5th century BCE, include such classics as Oedipus Rex, Antigone...
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