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Eros
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Eros

Eros was the Greek god of love, or more precisely, passionate and physical desire. Without warning he selects his targets and forcefully strikes at their hearts, bringing confusion and irrepressible feelings or, in the words of Hesiod, he...
Roman Medicine
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Roman Medicine

Roman medicine was greatly influenced by earlier Greek medicine and literature but would also make its own unique contribution to the history of medicine through the work of such famous experts as Galen and Celsus. Whilst there were professional...
Warfare & Battles in Ancient Greece
Quizby Patrick Goodman

Warfare & Battles in Ancient Greece

Darius I Cosmopolitan Delian League Diadochi Hoplite Hoplon Ionian Revolt Leonidas I Mardonius Miltiades Oblique Infantry Deployment Peace of Callias Pelopponesian League Phalanx Satrap Successor Themistocles Trireme Xerxes I
Iliad
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Iliad

Homer's Iliad describes the final year of the Trojan War, a legendary conflict between an alliance of Greek cities and the city of Troy in Anatolia. It was probably written in the 8th century BCE after a long oral tradition. The Greeks themselves...
Sacred Cakes in Ancient Greece
Articleby Nathalie Choubineh

Sacred Cakes in Ancient Greece

Sacred cakes in ancient Greece were baked loaves, biscuits, pastries, and sponges sweetened with honey (meli) and prepared as unburnt offerings to the gods and goddesses and other divine beings. Unburnt offerings were substitutes for or a...
Brennus
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Brennus

Brennus (c. 390 BCE) was the Gallic war chief of the Senones who sacked and occupied Rome in 390 BCE. Nothing is known of him outside of the accounts given of this event which immortalized him as coining the phrase, “Woe to the Vanquished”...
Sappho of Lesbos
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Sappho of Lesbos

Sappho of Lesbos (l. c. 620-570 BCE) was a lyric poet whose work was so popular in ancient Greece that she was honored in statuary, coinage, and pottery centuries after her death. Little remains of her work, and these fragments suggest she...
Arts and Culture in Ancient Greece
Quizby Patrick Goodman

Arts and Culture in Ancient Greece

Aesychlus Aristophanes Base Capital Chorus Comedy Corinthian column Dionysus Doric column Drama Entablature Entasis Euripides Frieze Ionic column Metope Pediment Philosophy Satyr play Shaft Skene Sophocles Tragedy Triglyph Socrates Plato...
Cortés & the Fall of the Aztec Empire
Articleby Mark Cartwright

Cortés & the Fall of the Aztec Empire

The Aztec empire flourished between c. 1345 and 1521 CE and dominated ancient Mesoamerica. This young and warlike nation was highly successful in spreading its reach and gaining fabulous wealth, but then all too quickly came the strange visitors...
Greek Trireme [Illustration]
Imageby MatthiasKabel & Sting

Greek Trireme [Illustration]

Model of a Greek Trireme. Displayed at Deutsches Museum, Munich, Germany.
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