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Seating of the Theatre of Epidaurus
Imageby Mark Cartwright

Seating of the Theatre of Epidaurus

The theatre of Epidaurus was first built in the 4th century BCE and is possibly the best preserved ancient Greek theatre. Extensions were made in the 2nd century BCE taking its capacity to 12,000.
Vikings
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Vikings

The Vikings were diverse Scandinavian seafarers from Norway, Sweden, and Denmark whose raids and subsequent settlements significantly impacted the cultures of Europe and were felt as far as the Mediterranean regions c. 790 - c. 1100 CE. The...
Demosthenes
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Demosthenes

Demosthenes (c. 384 - 322 BCE) was an Athenian statesman who famously stood against Macedonian king Philip II and whose surviving speeches have established him as one of the greatest patriots and powerful orators from ancient Greece. He is...
Gymnasium
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Gymnasium

The Gymnasium was a Greek building originally used for athletic activities but which came, over time, to be used also as a place of study and philosophical discussion. In the Hellenistic Period, gymnasia became highly standardized both in...
Trade & Commerce in Ancient Greece
Collectionby Mark Cartwright

Trade & Commerce in Ancient Greece

The ancient Mediterranean was a busy place with trading ships sailing in all directions to connect cities and cultures. The Greeks were so keen on the rewards of trade and commerce that they colonized large parts of the coastal Mediterranean...
Ecclesiazusae
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Ecclesiazusae

The Ecclesiazusae (aka Assemblywomen) is a comedy play written by Aristophanes, one of the great Greek comic playwrights. Written sometime between 393 and 391 BCE, it is, along with his play Wealth, one of only two he wrote after the Athenian...
Libation Bearers
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Libation Bearers

The play Libation Bearers was written by one of the greatest of all Greek tragedians Aeschylus (c. 525-455 BCE). Winning first prize at the Dionysia competition in 458 BCE, Libation Bearers was the second play in the trilogy The Oresteia...
Plutus
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Plutus

Plutus (aka Wealth) is a play written by the great Greek comedy playwright Aristophanes in 388 BCE. It was the last of his plays to be performed during his lifetime. Like his earlier play Ecclesiazusae (The Assemblywomen), Wealth was written...
Neo-Assyrian Empire
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Neo-Assyrian Empire

The Neo-Assyrian Empire (912-612 BCE) was, according to many historians, the first true empire in the world. The Assyrians had expanded their territory from the city of Ashur over the centuries, and their fortunes rose and fell with successive...
Jason & the Argonauts
Articleby Mark Cartwright

Jason & the Argonauts

The pan-Hellenic mythological hero Jason was famed for his expedition with the Argonauts - as the sailors on their ship the Argo were known - in search of the Golden Fleece in Kolchis on the Black Sea, one of the most popular and enduring...
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