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Olympia
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Olympia

Ancient Olympia was an ancient Greek sanctuary site dedicated to the worship of Zeus located in the western Peloponnese. The Pan-Hellenic Olympic Games were held at the site in honour of Zeus every four years from 776 BCE to 393 CE. Olympia...
Theatre of Dionysos Eleuthereus
Articleby Mark Cartwright

Theatre of Dionysos Eleuthereus

The theatre of Dionysos Eleuthereus on the south slope of the acropolis of Athens was first built in the 6th century BCE. Modified and expanded over the centuries, it is the oldest Greek theatre and is the site where some of the most famous...
Apollo, Olympia
Imageby Mark Cartwright

Apollo, Olympia

Marble statue (severe style) of Apollo (c. 460 BCE) from the west pediment of the temple of Zeus, Olympia (Olympia Archaeological Museum).
Trajan's Column
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Trajan's Column

Trajan's column, erected in 113 CE, stands in Trajan's Forum in Rome and is a commemorative monument decorated with reliefs illustrating Roman emperor Trajan's two military campaigns in Dacia (modern Romania). The column was the first of...
The Greek Phalanx
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

The Greek Phalanx

One of the most effective and enduring military formations in ancient warfare was that of the Greek phalanx. The age of the phalanx may be traced back to Sumeria in the 25th century BCE, through Egypt, and finally appearing in Greek literature...
Colossus of Rhodes
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Colossus of Rhodes

The Colossus of Rhodes was a gigantic 33-metre-high bronze statue of the sun god Helios which stood by the harbour of that city from c. 280 BCE. Rhodes was then one of the most important trading ports in the ancient Mediterranean and the...
Thales of Miletus
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Thales of Miletus

Thales of Miletus (l. c. 585 BCE) is traditionally regarded as the first Western philosopher and mathematician. He was born and lived in Miletus, a Greek colony on the west coast of present day Turkey, referenced as the birthplace of Greek...
Medea
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Medea

The tragedy Medea was written in 431 BCE by Euripides (c. 484 – 407 BCE). Euripides authored at least 90 plays of which 19 have survived intact. As with the plays by Sophocles and Aeschylus, the audience was already well aware of the...
Vitruvius
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Vitruvius

Marcus Vitruvius Pollio (c. 90 - c. 20 BCE), better known simply as Vitruvius, was a Roman military engineer and architect who wrote De Architectura (On Architecture), a treatise which combines the history of ancient architecture and engineering...
Orpheus
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Orpheus

Orpheus is a figure from ancient Greek mythology, most famous for his virtuoso ability in playing the lyre or kithara. His music could charm the wild animals of the forest, and even streams would pause and trees bend a little closer to hear...
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