Search Results: Greek Sculpture

Search

Hermes Ludovisi
Imageby Marie-Lan Nguyen

Hermes Ludovisi

Roman marble copy from the late 1st century CE - early 2nd century CE after a Greek original of 450-440 BCE (right hand restored). Possibly here as Hermes Psychopompos, leader of souls - the left hand beckons. Part of a monument in Athens...
Hesiod on the Birth of the Gods
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

Hesiod on the Birth of the Gods

The Greek poet Hesiod (c. 700 BCE) is most famous for his works Theogony and Works and Days. In this passage from Theogony, Hesiod relates the birth of the gods from cosmic Chaos and follows the lineage through the great Zeus, King of the...
The Hellenistic World: The World of Alexander the Great
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

The Hellenistic World: The World of Alexander the Great

The Hellenistic World (from the Greek word Hellas for Greece) is the known world after the conquests of Alexander the Great and corresponds roughly with the Hellenistic Period of ancient Greece, from 323 BCE (Alexander's death) to the annexation...
Hipparchia the Cynic: Devoted Wife, Mother, & Outspoken Greek Philosopher
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

Hipparchia the Cynic: Devoted Wife, Mother, & Outspoken Greek Philosopher

Cynic philosopher, wife of Crates of Thebes (l. c. 360 – 280 BCE), and mother of his children, Hipparchia of Maroneia (l. c. 350 – 280 BCE) defied social norms in order to live her beliefs. She is all the more impressive in that she taught...
Sicilian Temples (Greek Metrology)
Articleby Denitsa Dzhigova

Sicilian Temples (Greek Metrology)

Characteristics of Sicilian Archaic Temples The large dimensions of the components, the presence of a propteron, an adyton, and other specific elements of the plan and elevation speak for an originally very autonomous development of...
Famous Grammarians & Poets of the Byzantine Empire
Articleby Helene Perdicoyianni-Paleologou

Famous Grammarians & Poets of the Byzantine Empire

In the wake of the downfall of the Western Roman Empire and the intellectual collapse of Athens, Byzantine scholars engaged in preserving the Classical Greek language and its literature. Thus they became the guardians of a vanished culture...
Hygieia, the Goddess of Health
Articleby Mark Beumer

Hygieia, the Goddess of Health

Modern medicine has its origin in the ancient world. The oldest civilizations used magic and herbs to cure their sick people, but they also used religion to free them from harm and to protect their health. The medical care of today has its...
Michelangelo
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Michelangelo

Michelangelo (1475-1564 CE) was an Italian artist, architect and poet, who is considered one of the greatest and most influential of all Renaissance figures. His most celebrated works, from a breathtaking portfolio of masterpieces, include...
Belvedere Apollo
Imageby Mark Cartwright

Belvedere Apollo

The Belvedere Apollo statue considered to be a 2nd century CE copy of a bronze statue of the 4th century BCE by Leochares. The god would have once held a bow in his left hand. (The Vatican Museums, Rome).
Iphigenia in Aulis
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Iphigenia in Aulis

Iphigenia in Aulis (or at Aulis) was written by Euripides, the youngest and most popular of the trilogy of great Greek tragedians. The play was based on the well-known myth surrounding the sacrifice of Agamemnon and Clytemnestra's daughter...
Membership