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Poseidon
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Poseidon

Poseidon was the Greek god of the sea and rivers, creator of storms and floods, and the bringer of earthquakes and destruction. He was perhaps the most disruptive of all the ancient gods but he was not always a negative force. He was a protector...
Antigone
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Antigone

Antigone was the third play in the Oedipus trilogy written by the great Greek playwright Sophocles (c. 496 - c. 406 BCE). Produced around 441 BCE and receiving first prize at the Dionysia festival, the tragedy was actually written long before...
The Eumenides
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

The Eumenides

The Eumenides is a play written by Aeschylus (c 525 – 455 BCE), the “Father of Greek Tragedy,” the most popular and influential of all tragedians of his era. The Eumenides was the third play of a trilogy, The Oresteia, with...
Andromache
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Andromache

Andromache is a Greek tragedy written by Euripides (c. 484- 407 BCE), one of only 19 plays (out of 92) to survive. The play is actually in two parts, and like Sophocles' Women of Trachis, it has no central character. The first part of the...
Hesiod on the Birth of the Gods
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

Hesiod on the Birth of the Gods

The Greek poet Hesiod (c. 700 BCE) is most famous for his works Theogony and Works and Days. In this passage from Theogony, Hesiod relates the birth of the gods from cosmic Chaos and follows the lineage through the great Zeus, King of the...
Odysseus
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Odysseus

Famed for his courage, intelligence, and leadership, Odysseus (Roman name: Ulysses) was one of the great pan-Hellenic heroes of Greek mythology. His resourcefulness and oratory skills were instrumental in the Greek victory in the Trojan War...
Trade in Ancient Greece
Articleby Mark Cartwright

Trade in Ancient Greece

Trade was a fundamental aspect of the ancient Greek world and following territorial expansion, an increase in population movements, and innovations in transport, goods could be bought, sold, and exchanged in one part of the Mediterranean...
Greek Vase Painters & Potters
Articleby Trustees of the British Museum

Greek Vase Painters & Potters

We know the names of some potters and painters of Greek vases because they signed their work. Generally a painter signed his name followed by some form of the verb 'painted', while a potter (or perhaps the painter writing for him) signed...
Reconstruction of Asclepeion of Epidaurus
Imageby Ancient History Magazine/ Karwansaray Publishers

Reconstruction of Asclepeion of Epidaurus

A reconstruction of the Temple of Asclepius in Epidaurus. Illustration by Julia Lillo.
Pythagoras
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Pythagoras

Pythagoras (l.c. 571- c. 497 BCE) was a Greek philosopher whose teachings emphasized the immortality and transmigration of the soul (reincarnation), virtuous, humane behavior toward all living things, and the concept of “number” as truth...
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