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Mycenaean Art
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Mycenaean Art

The Mycenaean civilization flourished in the late Bronze Age from the 15th to the 13th century BCE, and their artists would continue the traditions passed on to them from Minoan Crete. Pottery, frescoes, and goldwork skillfully depicted scenes...
Hellenistic Warfare
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Hellenistic Warfare

When Alexander the Great died in 323 BCE, he left behind an empire devoid of leadership. Without a named successor or heir, the old commanders simply divided the kingdom among themselves. For the next three decades, they fought a lengthy...
Battle of Pydna
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Battle of Pydna

The Battle of Pydna in June 168 BCE was a decisive Roman victory that ended the Third Macedonian War and established Rome as the dominant power in the Mediterranean. The Roman Republic was expanding, enlarging its sphere of influence along...
Bronze Age Aegean
Definitionby Kelly Macquire

Bronze Age Aegean

The Bronze Age (c. 3000-1000 BCE) is the period when cultures were either using, producing, or trading bronze. Several cultures flourished around the Aegean Sea during this period: the Minoan civilization on Crete, the Mycenaean civilization...
Mycenaean Society
Definitionby Mackenzie Klaeser

Mycenaean Society

Mycenaean society was strictly hierarchical, valued family lineage, and awarded higher social status to those involved with religious or military activities and palatial administration. The lower classes contained craftsmen and artisans who...
Peloponnesian War
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Peloponnesian War

The Peloponnesian War between Athens and Sparta and their respective allies came in two stages: from c. 460 to 446 and from 431 to 404 BCE. With battles at home and abroad, the long and complex conflict was damaging to both sides. Sparta...
Greek and Phoenician Colonization
Imageby Kelly Macquire

Greek and Phoenician Colonization

Both the ancient Greeks and Phoenicians extensively colonized vast areas of Europe, along the Mediterranean and Black Sea coasts. In doing so, they spread their culture, which strongly influenced the local tribes. For the Greeks, this is...
Hellenistic & Roman Agora of Athens
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

Hellenistic & Roman Agora of Athens

Pericles’ agora of Athens flourished under Macedonian control. After Macedon was defeated by Rome, the Romans added to the district even before Greece was taken as a province and more so afterwards. The Roman version of the agora continued...
Corinth
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Corinth

Corinth was a Greek, Hellenistic and Roman city located on the isthmus which connects mainland Greece with the Peloponnese. Surrounded by fertile plains and blessed with natural springs, ancient Corinth was a centre of trade, had a naval...
Government in Ancient Greece
Quizby Patrick Goodman

Government in Ancient Greece

Acropolis Agora Greek Archaic Period Archon Areopagus Aristocracy Assembly Boule City-State Greek Classical Period Democracy Demos Diarchy Ephor Gerousia Helot Hetaireiai Labyrinth Laconicism Minoan Monarchy Mycenaean Oligarchy Ostracism...