Search Results: First Crusade

Search

The Masaesyli and Massylii of Numidia
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

The Masaesyli and Massylii of Numidia

The North African Berber kingdom of Numidia (202-40 BCE) was originally inhabited by a tribe (or federation of tribes) known as the Masaesyli, to the west, and a coalition of smaller tribes, known as the Massylii, to the east. The meaning...
King Louis IX Carrying the Crown of Thorns
Imageby The Metropolitan Museum of Art

King Louis IX Carrying the Crown of Thorns

Created in Tours, France, sometime between 1245-1248 CE, this stained glass panel depicts King Louis IX (r. 1226-1270 CE) carrying the crown of thorns. Measures 55 x 35 cm. (Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York)
Battle of the Field of Blood (1119 CE)
Imageby Medieval Warfare Magazine / Karwansaray Publishers

Battle of the Field of Blood (1119 CE)

Artists impression of the Battle of the Field of Blood (1119 CE) by Marek Szyszko. Copyright, republished with permission from Medieval Warfare Magazine / Karwansaray Publishers.
The Coffin Texts
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

The Coffin Texts

The Coffin Texts (c. 2134-2040 BCE) are 1,185 spells, incantations, and other forms of religious writing inscribed on coffins to help the deceased navigate the afterlife. They include the text known as the Book of Two Ways which is the first...
Consul
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Consul

In 509 BCE with the exit of the last Etruscan king, Tarquin the Elder, the Roman people were presented with a unique opportunity, an opportunity that would eventually have an immense impact on the rest of Europe for centuries to come: the...
Elephants in Greek & Roman Warfare
Articleby Mark Cartwright

Elephants in Greek & Roman Warfare

In the search for ever more impressive and lethal weapons to shock the enemy and bring total victory the armies of ancient Greece, Carthage, and even sometimes Rome turned to the elephant. Huge, exotic, and frightening the life out of an...
The Assassination of Julius Caesar
Articleby Donald L. Wasson

The Assassination of Julius Caesar

Veni, vidi, vici! This was the simple message the Roman commander Julius Caesar sent to the Senate in Rome after a resounding victory in the east against King Pharnaces of Pontus - a message that demonstrated both arrogance as well as great...
Coin of Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II
Imageby The British Museum

Coin of Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II

Gold coin of Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II, minted in Sicily between 1211-1250 CE. Weighs 5.2 grammes and measures 20 mm (British Museum, London)
Marcus Licinius Crassus
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Marcus Licinius Crassus

Marcus Licinius Crassus (115-53 BCE) was perhaps the richest man in Roman history and in his eventful life he experienced both great successes and severe disappointments. His vast wealth and sharp political skills brought him two consulships...
Spartacus
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Spartacus

Throughout history - both ancient and modern - those bound in chains have fought to free themselves from their oppressors. As with most civilizations - Assyrian, Greek and even American - slaves in ancient Rome were not considered citizens...
Membership