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Apophis
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Apophis

Apophis (also known as Apep) is the Great Serpent, enemy of the sun god Ra, in ancient Egyptian religion. The sun was Ra's great barge which sailed through the sky from dawn to dusk and then descended into the underworld. As it sailed through...
Senusret III
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Senusret III

Senusret III (c. 1878-1860 BCE, also known as Senwosret III, Sesostris III) was the 5th king of the 12th Dynasty of the Middle Kingdom of Egypt (2040-1782 BCE). His reign is often considered the height of the Middle Kingdom which was the...
Isis
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Isis

Isis is an ancient Egyptian goddess who became the most popular and enduring of all the Egyptian deities. Her name comes from the Egyptian Eset, ("the seat") which referred to her stability and also the throne of Egypt as she was considered...
Statue of Asklepios
Imageby Nina Aldin Thune

Statue of Asklepios

Statue of Asclepius, the Greek God of medicine, holding the symbolic Rod of Asclepius with its coiled serpent. The Glypotek, Copenhagen.
Hygieia, Palazzo Altemps
Imageby Mark Cartwright

Hygieia, Palazzo Altemps

A Pentelic marble bust of Hygieia, the Greek and Roman goddess of medicine and healing. 2nd century CE. (Palazzo Altemps, Rome)
Ancient Egyptian Agriculture
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

Ancient Egyptian Agriculture

Agriculture was the foundation of the ancient Egyptian economy and vital to the lives of the people of the land. Agricultural practices began in the Delta Region of northern Egypt and the fertile basin known as the Faiyum in the Predynastic...
The Egyptian Cinderella Story Debunked
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

The Egyptian Cinderella Story Debunked

The story of Cinderella is one of the most popular in the world. In the west, it has enjoyed a continuous following since its revision and publication by Charles Perrault in 1697 CE but the tale of the young heroine, unjustly forced into...
Roman Science
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Roman Science

The Romans assimilated earlier Greek science for their own purposes, evaluating and then accepting or rejecting that which was most useful, much as they did in other fields such as warfare, art, and theatre. This assimilation of Greek thought...
Ancient Greek Inventions
Articleby Mark Cartwright

Ancient Greek Inventions

The ancient Greeks are often credited with building the foundations upon which all western cultures are built, and this impressive accolade stems from their innovative contributions to a wide range of human activities, from sports to medicine...
Nile
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Nile

The world's longest river, located in Egypt, the Nile flows 4,132 miles (6,650 kilometres) northward to the Mediterranean Sea (a very unusual direction for a river to take). It was considered the source of life by the ancient Egyptians and...
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