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Search Results: Carthaginian Warfare

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The Masaesyli and Massylii of Numidia
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

The Masaesyli and Massylii of Numidia

The North African Berber kingdom of Numidia (202-40 BCE) was originally inhabited by a tribe (or federation of tribes) known as the Masaesyli, to the west, and a coalition of smaller tribes, known as the Massylii, to the east. The meaning...
Phoenician/Punic Necklace with Amulets
Imageby Carole Raddato

Phoenician/Punic Necklace with Amulets

Phoenician or Carthaginian amulets in the form of bearded heads made of sand-core glass, 4th-3rd century BCE (Cagliari, Museo Archeologico Nazionale).
Dido, Carthaginian Tetradrachm
Imageby The British Museum

Dido, Carthaginian Tetradrachm

A silver tetradrachm from Carthage. The female head has been identified by some historians as Dido (Elissa), the legendary founder of the city. Other historians identify the figure as the goddess Tanit (aka Tinnit). She wears a Phrygian cap...
Carthaginian Necklace
Imageby Carole Raddato

Carthaginian Necklace

A necklace of glass paste beads, Carthage, 4th-3rd century BCE. (National Archaeological Museum, Cagliari)
Priestess of Isis on a Carthaginian Sarcophagus Lid
Imageby Père Delattre

Priestess of Isis on a Carthaginian Sarcophagus Lid

An illustration of a sarcophagus lid from Carthage depicting a priestess of Isis. (Carthage National Museum, Byrsa, Tunisia)
Carthaginian Tombstone for Maximilla Bassi
Imageby Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin

Carthaginian Tombstone for Maximilla Bassi

This finely carved limestone monument was set up in a memory for a woman called Maximilla Bassi. The Latin inscription says "Maximilla Bassi, Pious daughter, lived nineteen years. Here she is placed". After the Roman annexation of Carthage...
Carthaginian Tombstone for Gemellus
Imageby Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin

Carthaginian Tombstone for Gemellus

This limestone monument was set up in a cemetery in Carthage, in memory of a man called Gemellus. The inscription towards the base is written in Phoenician, the native language of ancient Carthage, often known as Punic, and states "This tombstone...
Battles of the Roman Republic
Collectionby Mark Cartwright

Battles of the Roman Republic

In this collection we look at some of the most significant battles that shaped the history of the Roman Republic. There were defeats such as at Allia River to the Celts in 390 BCE or at Cannae in 216 BCE when the Carthaginians led by Hannibal...
Battle of Hydaspes
Articleby Donald L. Wasson

Battle of Hydaspes

For almost a decade, Alexander the Great and his army swept across Western Asia and into Egypt, defeating King Darius III and the Persians at the battles of River Granicus, Issus and Gaugamela. Next, despite the objections of the loyal army...
Roman Art
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Roman Art

The Romans controlled such a vast empire for so long a period that a summary of the art produced in that time can only be a brief and selective one. Perhaps, though, the greatest points of distinction for Roman art are its very diversity...