Search Results: Byzantine Government

Search

Mandate of Heaven
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Mandate of Heaven

The Mandate of Heaven (Tianming), also known as Heaven's Mandate, was the divine source of authority and the right to rule of China's early kings and emperors. The ancient god or divine force known as Heaven or Sky had selected this particular...
Coronation of Theophilos
Imageby Unknown Artist

Coronation of Theophilos

An illustration from a 12th century CE manuscript depicting the coronation of Byzantine emperor Theophilos, r. 829-842 CE. (Madrid Skylitzes, National Library, Madrid)
Basil I & Leo VI Confront Each Other
Imageby Unknown Artist

Basil I & Leo VI Confront Each Other

A 13th century CE illustration showing Byzantine emperor Basil I (r. 867-886 CE) confronting Leo VI, his son, murderer and successor. (Madrid Sklitzes, National Library, Madrid)
Ten Ancient Rome Facts You Need to Know
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

Ten Ancient Rome Facts You Need to Know

Ancient Roman culture affected vast numbers of people across the known world of its time, beginning with the rise of the Roman Republic (509-27 BCE) and throughout the duration of the Roman Empire (27 BCE - c. 476 CE in the West and 1453...
The Crusades: Causes & Goals
Articleby Mark Cartwright

The Crusades: Causes & Goals

The Crusades were a series of military campaigns organised by Christian powers in order to retake Jerusalem and the Holy Land back from Muslim control. There would be eight officially sanctioned crusades between 1095 CE and 1270 CE and many...
John II Komnenos
Imageby Myrabella

John II Komnenos

Byzantine emperor John II Komnenos (r. 1118-1143 CE). From a 12th century CE mosaic panel in the south gallery of the Hagia Sophia, Istanbul. The emperor is shown offering a gift to the Virgin and young Christ.
Parthia (Empire)
Definitionby Patrick Scott Smith, M. A.

Parthia (Empire)

The Parthians ruled from 247 BCE to 224 CE creating a vast empire that stretched from the Mediterranean in the west to India and China in the east. East of the Caspian Sea there emerged from the steppe of Central Asia a nomadic Scythian tribe...
Roman Citizenship
Articleby Donald L. Wasson

Roman Citizenship

Citizenship is and always has been a valued possession of any individual. When one studies the majority of ancient empires one finds that the concept of citizenship, in any form, was non-existent. The people in these societies did not and...
Famous Grammarians & Poets of the Byzantine Empire
Articleby Helene Perdicoyianni-Paleologou

Famous Grammarians & Poets of the Byzantine Empire

In the wake of the downfall of the Western Roman Empire and the intellectual collapse of Athens, Byzantine scholars engaged in preserving the Classical Greek language and its literature. Thus they became the guardians of a vanished culture...
Abu Bakr
Definitionby Syed Muhammad Khan

Abu Bakr

Abu Bakr (l. 573-634 CE, r. 632-634 CE) was an early convert of Islam; he was a close friend and confidant of the Islamic Prophet Muhammad, and became the first caliph of the Islamic empire – a successor to Muhammad's temporal position but...
Membership