Search Results: Byzantine Art

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Empress Zoe
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Empress Zoe

Zoe Porphyrogenita was empress of the Byzantine Empire from 1028 CE until her death in 1050 CE. In an eventful career, she reigned alongside three husbands, had a hand in the succession of her adopted son, and, in 1042 CE, she was co-ruler...
Byzantine Jeweled Bracelet
Imageby Metropolitan Museum of Art

Byzantine Jeweled Bracelet

Dating to 500-700 CE, this gold bracelet is elaborately decorated with silver, pearls, amethyst, sapphire, glass and quartz. The interior features opus interrasile patterns. Overall, it measures 3.8 x 8.2 cm; the strap measures 2.3 x 19.5...
Tyrian Purple
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Tyrian Purple

Tyrian purple (aka Royal purple or Imperial purple) is a dye extracted from the murex shellfish which was first produced by the Phoenician city of Tyre in the Bronze Age. Its difficulty of manufacture, striking purple to red colour range...
Minoan Art
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Minoan Art

The art of the Minoan civilization of Bronze Age Crete (2000-1500 BCE) displays a love of animal, sea, and plant life, which was used to decorate frescoes and pottery and also inspired forms in jewellery, stone vessels, and sculpture. Minoan...
Parthian Art
Definitionby Patrick Scott Smith, M. A.

Parthian Art

Parthian art flourished within the Eurasian cultural corridor from the late hundreds BCE to the early 1st and 2nd centuries CE. With the Parthian Empire (247 BCE - 224 CE) stretching from India and China in the east to the Mediterranean shores...
Marine Life in Ancient Mediterranean Art
Image Galleryby Mark Cartwright

Marine Life in Ancient Mediterranean Art

Throughout the history of the ancient Mediterranean artists were always keen to express their appreciation of the bounty of the sea. Marine life of all kinds, real and imagined, was frequently depicted on frescoes, pottery, mosaics and coins...
The Art of the Han Dynasty
Articleby Mark Cartwright

The Art of the Han Dynasty

The art of the Han dynasty (206 BCE - 220 CE) of ancient China is characterised by a new desire to represent everyday life and the stories from history and mythology familiar to all. The arts were fuelled both by a political stability with...
Rubin Museum's Faith and Empire: Tibetan Buddhist Art
Interviewby James Blake Wiener

Rubin Museum's Faith and Empire: Tibetan Buddhist Art

Faith and Empire: Art and Politics in Tibetan Buddhism, a new exhibition at the Rubin Museum of Art in New York, explores the dynamic historical intersection of politics, religion, and art as reflected through Tibetan Buddhism. The exhibition...
Celtic Coinage
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Celtic Coinage

The coinage of the ancient Celts, minted from the early 3rd century BCE to the 1st century CE, at first imitated Greek and then Roman coins. Celtic engravers then soon developed their own unique style, creating distinctive coins with depictions...
Interview: Nudity in the Ancient World
Interviewby James Blake Wiener

Interview: Nudity in the Ancient World

The nude figure is a universal visual theme, deeply rooted in the history of art, and it is seemingly ubiquitous in the art of the ancient civilizations of the Near East and Mediterranean. The Antikenmuseum, in Basel, Switzerland, recently...
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